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a Camel is a Horse designed by a Comitee

 
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Moritz



Joined: 10 Mar 2014
Posts: 225

PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 9:02 pm    Post subject: a Camel is a Horse designed by a Comitee Reply with quote

But they never tell you which comite designed that Camel.

Was it a Parliamentary, Church, Leftie, Anarchist or Illuminated Comite?

Another day, another row with Dai: his latest cunning plan (cgp) is to turn el Presidente magnifico into the Queen of England, Brenda herself.

Split votes - the score is exactly 50 - 50, what then?

MORITZ: If a decision needs to be made, then roll a die. If it aint urgent, drop it.

DAI: No! That is the exact wrong way to do it. Plato from on high has decreed that in the Ideal State, each committee has an even number, plus a chairman who has no vote, but when the even numbered committee has a split vote, then chairman votes for status quo.

MORITZ: That's retarded!!! Why bother having a chair? Just have a comite with an odd number and then they can just make a ****ing decision which is the whole point of having a ^^^^ing comite in the first place.

DAI: No. You must have an even number on the committee, so the chairman can vote for status quo.

Then Dai broke my car and walked off in a huff and him with that pain in all the diodes ....


Anarchist Crossing the Desert cmt designed the Camel.



[/i][/b]
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mmm ... Y Repwblic is no place to settle private rows : that is why I barely mention my long-running political arguments with certain politicians but just stick to vaguely slagging off the lot of them ... On the other hand since you have mentioned it : I called on Daf/Moritz on the off-chance of going somewhere for The Sunday Lunch and happily accepted the invitation to go to The Big Cheese Festival in Caerphilly ( along with Asamux ) and merrily ... well ... I took the crap out of the back of his car and then raised the seat ready for Asamux but as it snapped into place the seat belt on that side caught in the metal loop - now Daf threw a tantrum at this and it promised to be awkward so we got on our way and I promised to wrestle with it once Daf/Moritz had parked up - which I proceeded to do once we had driven around a bit due to the brilliant planning for the event which involved closing the car parks ...

... My idea was for Daf/Moritz to haul on the seat belt whilst I pushed down on the button ... and he of course thinks that our not succeeding was merely my pushing his button whereas he actually finally pushed my button by throwing a second tantrum and so I walked off swearing at him and made my way home on the train after I had spent some time trying to figure out how much it would cost to build such a castle in modern times - I reckon that it would cost the taxpayers some £4,000,000,000+ before the project was abandoned by The Welsh Government immediately after they had rejected all of the tenders - that would just be the fees for the consultants and the costs of the junkets involved where their committees will go on fact-finding tours to study other castle building projects ... in the Bahamas, Disney World ... The Moon ...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caerphilly_Castle

... Of course any true patriot would want to spend money on finally demolishing these remains of The Imperialism in The Untied Kingdom.


Last edited by dai on Mon Aug 01, 2016 7:25 am; edited 1 time in total
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2016 11:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hang on Moritz - given your casual unfounded remarks, your extended family does not extend as far as including Donnie Trumpo does it ?

Surely you would prefer to agree with Trumbo not Trumpo - and you would accept the committee's right to be wrong on this if I were the chairman ? *

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/how-dalton-trumbos-kids-changed-819836

* I do not think that this question has in any way infringed upon your rights as President and Tyrant of The United Republic of All of These Islands but of course you may not perceive me to be upholding the Status Quo ... but can I trust that you will vote according to your Well-Red scruples as a Poblachiaethwr ?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SWBRcWDsHkk
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casting_vote

I did not realise how many variations of The Casting Vote there are or have been : perhaps Daf/Moritz is right and The President should just throw a tantrum if things are not going his/her way and declare that just because everybody else voted differently his/her vote decides the matter ... My Dad would probably have agreed with that sentiment but as Area Chairman he would feel bound to apply the union's rules to himself whilst bitterly complaining about the likely consequences of the decision - not to mention enjoying the satisfaction of being able to assert that he being proven right afterwards ... The problem with voting is that it enables people to shoot from the hip etc without considering the consequences of a decision and even worse without owning it for themselves which is an especial problem when things go wrong : that is when projects are either abandoned because the costs involved are crippling or because The Democrats go running after some other project ( or pretend to ) because they want to be re-elected by -'The People Who Care Nothing About Politics But Have Been Promised Cash by The Democrats - or are pursued despite the expense involved and with indifference to the results because The Democrats Are Never Wrong And Therefore Can Not Make Any Mistakes Like ... Concorde ?

So - a suitable question to debate : was The Concorde a camel or a donkey ?

http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/77jan/gillman.htm
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Moritz



Joined: 10 Mar 2014
Posts: 225

PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the difference between you and your dad.
Your dad was forced to apply retarded rules and resented it.
You volunteer to apply retarded rules with glee and gloating.

CMT needs an odd number of delegates so they can make a £$£$ing decision which is what they are there for.

You want cmt to have an even number of appointees so they can do whimsical short cuts.




As soon as Dai went off in his whimsical huff, I succeeded and repaired the car.
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dai



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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2016 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes - Dafydd fitz Mor - ! - apparently eased the buckles jammed beneath the belt - a pity that I am a pacifist really because I wanted involved knuckles jammed beneath the belt - ah ! - But here is the thing : Asamux told me this evening that you did all this in a state of sweet calm and reasoning ... YOU BASTARD - WHY CAN YOU NOT ALSO BE SO WITH ME ??? ... Almost anything that I say or do you find fault with - are you practising for a sex change ? ... You will have to improve your driving if you are you know ... and design a better muse trap in order to have others beat a path to your door ... but we must now strive for concord here -

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concorde

" ... Concorde was jointly developed and manufactured by Aérospatiale and the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC) under an Anglo-French treaty. Concorde's name, meaning harmony or union, reflects the co-operation on the project between the United Kingdom and France. ... The research and development failed to make a profit and the two then state-owned airlines bought the aircraft at a huge discount. ... The aircraft has been regarded as an aviation icon, while it was also criticised for being uneconomical, and lacking a credible market. ... "
... and The Welsh Connection was ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morien_Morgan

" Sir Morien Bedford Morgan CB FRS[1](20 December 1912 – 4 April 1978), was a noted Welsh aeronautical engineer, sometimes known as "the Father Of Concorde". He spent most of his career at the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), before moving to Whitehall for ten years as the Controller of Aircraft within the Ministry of Aviation. He spent the last years of his life as master of Downing College, Cambridge. ... He was born in Bridgend, the son of draper John Bedford Morgan and teacher Edith Mary Thomas, and fourth great grandson of John Bedford, ironmaster. ... After a brief apprenticeship at Vickers Aviation, Morgan took a position at the Aerodynamics Department within the RAE in 1935. ... In 1959 he left the RAE to become the scientific advisor to the Air Ministry, and then from 1960 to 1969 held a variety of posts within the Ministry. He returned to the RAE as Director in 1969, and served in this role until 1972. In 1967, he became the first Welshman to be President of the Royal Aeronautical Society. ... In 1972 he succeeded Prof. Keith Guthrie as Master of Downing College, Cambridge, a post he held until his death ... In 1948 Morgan began research into the development of a supersonic passenger airliner. In November 1956 he became Chairman of the newly formed Supersonic Transport Aircraft Committee, or STAC. STAC funded research into the SST field at several UK aviation firms though the 1950s. By the late 1950s, STAC had started the process of selecting specific designs for development, and after the forced merger of most UK aviation firms in 1960, selected the Bristol 223 as the basis for a transatlantic design. The Bristol work would form the basis for the Concorde. ... "


... NOW - DAFYDD Y DWG : REMEMBER YOU SWEATING OUT THE MATHEMATICS ABOUT THOSE CENTRES OF GRAVY IN THE LARGER FLAT DISHES ? ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concorde#Ogee_planform_selected

" Küchemann and others at the RAE continued their work on the slender delta throughout, considering three basic shapes; the classic straight-edge delta, the "gothic delta" that was rounded outwards to appear like a gothic arch, and the "ogival wing" that was compound-rounded into the shape of an ogee. Each of these planforms had their own advantages and disadvantages in terms of aerodynamics. As they worked with these shapes, a practical concern grew to become so important that it forced selection of one of these designs. ... Generally one wants to have the wing's centre of pressure (CP, or "lift point") close to the aircraft's centre of gravity (CG, or "balance point") to reduce the amount of control force required to pitch the aircraft. As the aircraft layout changes during the design phase, it is common for the CG to move fore or aft. With a normal wing design this can be addressed by moving the wing slightly fore or aft to account for this. ... With a delta wing running most of the length of the fuselage, this was no longer easy; moving the wing would leave it in front of the nose or behind the tail. Studying the various layouts in terms of CG changes, both during design and changes due to fuel use during flight, the ogee planform immediately came to the fore. ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concorde#Partnership_with_Sud

... By this time similar political and economic concerns in France had led to their own SST plans. ... As soon as the design was complete, in April 1960, Pierre Satre, the company's technical director, was sent to Bristol to discuss a partnership. Bristol was surprised to find that the Sud team had designed a very similar aircraft after considering the SST problem and coming to the very same conclusions as the Bristol and STAC teams in terms of economics. It was later revealed that the original STAC report, marked "For UK Eyes Only", had secretly been passed to the French to win political favour. Sud made minor changes to the paper, and presented it as their own work. ... Unsurprisingly, the two teams found much to agree on. ... neither company had experience in the use of high-heat metals for airframes, a maximum speed of around Mach 2 was selected so aluminium could be used – above this speed the friction with the air warms the metal so much that aluminium begins to soften. ... The only disagreements were over the size and range. The UK team was still focused on a 150 passenger design serving transatlantic routes, while the French were deliberately avoiding these. However, this proved not to be the barrier it might seem; common components could be used in both designs, with the shorter range version using a clipped fuselage and four engines, the longer one with a stretched fuselage and six engines, leaving only the wing to be extensively re-designed ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concorde#Cabinet_response.2C_treaty

" ... When the STAC plans were presented to the UK cabinet, a very negative reaction resulted. The economic considerations were considered highly questionable, especially as these were based on development costs, now estimated to be £150 million, which were repeatedly overrun in the industry ... This concern led to an independent review of the project by the Committee on Civil Scientific Research and Development ... Their report in October stated that it was unlikely there would be any direct positive economic outcome, but that the project should still be considered for the simple reason that everyone else was going supersonic, and they were concerned they would be locked out of future markets. Conversely, it appeared the project would not be likely to significantly impact other, more important, research efforts. ... the decision to proceed ultimately fell to an unlikely political expediency. At the time, the UK was pressing for admission to the European Common Market, which was being controlled by Charles de Gaulle who felt the UK's Special Relationship with the US made them unacceptable in a pan-European group. Cabinet felt that signing a deal with Sud would pave the way for Common Market entry, and this became the main deciding reason for moving ahead with the deal.[23] It was this belief that had led the original STAC documents being leaked to the French. However, De Gaulle spoke of the European origin of the design, and continued to block the UK's entry into the Common Market. ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concorde#Testing

... While Concorde had initially held a great deal of customer interest, the project was hit by a large number of order cancellations. The Paris Le Bourget air show crash of the competing Soviet Tupolev Tu-144 had shocked potential buyers, and public concern over the environmental issues presented by a supersonic aircraft – the sonic boom, take-off noise and pollution – had produced a shift in public opinion of SSTs. ... The United States cancelled the Boeing 2707, its rival supersonic transport programme, in 1971. Observers have suggested that opposition to Concorde on grounds of noise pollution had been encouraged by the United States Government, as it lacked its own competitor ... Concorde had other considerable difficulties that led to its dismal sales performance. Costs had spiralled during development to more than six times the original projections, arriving at a unit cost of £23 million in 1977. ... World events had also dampened Concorde sales prospects, the 1973 oil crisis made many airlines think twice about aircraft with high fuel consumption rates; and new wide-body aircraft, such as the Boeing 747, had recently made subsonic aircraft significantly more efficient and presented a low-risk option for airlines. ...


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Concorde_Project

" ... The Anti-Concorde Project, founded by Richard Wiggs, challenged the idea of supersonic passenger transport, and curtailed Concorde's commercial prospects. When Concorde entered service in 1976, of the 74 options (non-binding orders, from 16 airlines) held at the time of the first flight, only those for the state airlines of Britain (BOAC) and France (Air France) were taken up, so that only 20 were built, although flights were also flown for Braniff International and Singapore Airlines. It triggered research into the factors affecting the creation of sonic booms, which led to the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration and Quiet Supersonic Platform which achieved their goal of reducing the intensity of sonic booms, and echoed public concern about aircraft noise that resulted in more restrictive noise limits for aircraft and airport operations, as well as changes in both operating procedures and aircraft design to further reduce noise levels. ... Research by aeronautics engineer Bo Lundberg, Director of the Swedish Aeronautical Research Institute in the early 1960s suggested that sonic booms and aircraft engine noise would not be widely accepted. ... The Anti-Concorde Project was founded in 1966 by Richard Wiggs (a school teacher) to oppose the development of supersonic passenger transport. Wiggs positioned the Concorde as a test case in the confrontation between the environment and technology. ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Concorde_Project#Origins

... In 1963, The Observer newspaper published The Supersonic Threat, based on Lundberg's study Speed and Safety In Civil Aviation. The article claimed that the Concorde's sonic booms would produce effects varying from annoyance to physical shock, breaking windows and causing structural damage to buildings. In letters to the paper, some readers wrote that this would be an "intolerable price for ordinary citizen's to pay for the transportation of privileged business travelers ... A primary school teacher, conscientious objector and vegan from Letchworth, Hertfordshire, Richard Wiggs, wrote to The Observer inviting people to write to him. He received 80 letters the next day, and within a few months gave up teaching to become full-time organiser of the Anti-Concorde Project. ... In a letter to The Times in July 1967, Wiggs wrote: " ... Our immediate aims are to help create in Britain a climate of public opinion in which it will be possible for the Government to terminate work upon Concord, and to press the Government to make this decision. Our further aim (in co-operation with similar movements in other countries) is to help bring about the banning of supersonic transports internationally. ... " ... Letter-writing only went so far, and so Wiggs began advertising in the national press, initially in New Scientist, New Society and the New Statesman, and later, full page advertisements in The Guardian, The Times, and The Observer. The advertisements argued against supersonic transport, and requested donations for further advertisements. ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Concorde_Project#Sonic_boom

... the air remains still until the plane has approached to within half an inch, at which point the air is forced aside in a few millionths of a second. ... and a shockwave spreads outwards in a cone. This pressure wave extends as much as 25 miles either side of the flight path, and may be experienced as a loud sound, with accompanying vibration severe enough in close proximity to break windows and damage buildings. ... In July 1967, the UK Ministry of Technology staged eleven supersonic test flights over the south of England using Lightning fighters. The booms were to be measured by the RAe to relate them to the resulting public reaction. The Guardian's opinion survey stated: "Nearly two thirds of the population of Bristol were frightened, startled or annoyed by the sonic booms to which they were subjected to last week." The Ministry received 12,000 complaints ... [ - THE WELSH BIT - ] ... Between 1970 and 1972, when prototype Concorde 002 made 20 flights over the Irish Sea, The Government paid £40,000 in damages for cracked and broken windows, slates falling from roofs, panicking farm animals and frightened people. ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Concorde_Project#Airport_noise

... Both Wiggs and the Anti-Concord Project claimed that the Concorde was louder than conventional aircraft on take-off and landing as a result of its delta wing being optimized for high speeds so it needed to use more power than conventional aircraft. In 1977, the British Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) released figures showing that on every count - take-off, landing, and sideline measurements - Concorde's noise level was similar to other aircraft being operated, and in some cases significantly lower. ... [ - BUT IF THIS HAD BEEN PUT TO THE VOTE WHO WOULD HAVE BOTHERED TO FIND OUT THE FACTS ? - ]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Concorde_Project#Media

... The Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick holds a collection of archives of the Anti-Concorde Project, comprising publicity material issued by the Project, 1967–1981, minutes and agendas of the Advisory Committee, and subject files compiled by the Secretary of the Project. The collection also includes press cuttings, reports and publications. ... The 2003 BBC2 documentary, Concorde - A Love Story aired in the US in 2005 as a PBS Nova documentary, Supersonic Dream, and includes archival footage of Wiggs and interviews with family members. As narrator Richard Donat explains: "In Britain, Concorde's nemesis came in the guise of a retired schoolteacher, Richard Wiggs. Working from his family home, his aim was simple: to stop Concorde from flying."
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dai



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I crawled into bed I am thinking about my Dad who was a radar operator on Anglesey in the 1950s - doing his Notional Service and loathing it as a waste of his time when he could be playing football - he was honorable re the Official Secrets Act and never told me about what their mobile unit was actually observing but I take it that it was probably to do with misguided missiles and possibly the misguided space programme ... In contrast to what the Russians and Americans spent their money on - i.e. The Republic in The Moon - the French and British project was not only immensely practical but a strong contrast - Concorde V The Cold War ... an economic failure, technically a bit iffy - but a huge political success ?
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dai



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyway - " The Public Sphere " is surely just one big committee ... Here is a calm rational reasonably intelligent voice upon the matter ... I was waiting for her it he me to mention Diderot ... and then he she it defined " The Republic of Letters " in this way -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiaoe7WX3bI = Denis Diderot BIOGRAPHY

... the increasing study of the fine arts as well as access to amateur published works led to more people becoming interested in reading and discussing music ... music magazines, reviews and critical works which suited amateurs as well as connessours began to surface ... " The Republic of Letters " was coined by Pierre Bayle in his journal Nouvelles Republique des Lettres Towards the end of 18th the editor of this literary survey, described the Republic of Letters as being

" of all of the governments that decide the fate of men in the bosom of so many states, in the majority of them exists in a certain realm which holds sway only over the mind, that we honour with the name " The Republic " because it preserves a measure of independence and because it is almost its essence is to be free. It is the realm of talent and of thought."

The Republic of Letters was the sum of a number of Enlightenment ideals : an egalitarian realm governed by knowledge that could act across political boundaries and rival state power. It was a forum that supported free public examination of questions regarding religion or legislation. Emanuel Kant considered written communication as essential to his conception of the public sphere : once everyone was a part of the reading public then society could be said to be Enlightened. The People Who Participated in The Republic of Letters - such as Diderot and Voltaire - are frequently known today as important Enlightenment figures. Indeed the men who wrote Diderot's Encyclopedie arguably formed a microcosm of the larger Republic.

Many women played an essential part in The French Enlightenment due to the role which they played as salonnierres in Parisian salons as the contrast to the male philosophes. The Salon was the principle social institution of The Republic and became the civil working space of the project of The Enlightenment. Women as salonnierres were the legitimate governors of the potentially unruly discourses that took place there. While women were marginalised in the public culture of The Ancien Regime, The French Revolution destroyed the old cultural and economic restraints of patronage and corporatism, opening French society to female participation - particularly in the literary sphere.
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