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Conatus ( & Cones, Pyramids, The Eye, Sunbeams etc )

 
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dai



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 6:36 pm    Post subject: Conatus ( & Cones, Pyramids, The Eye, Sunbeams etc ) Reply with quote

The Conatus is truly not a con -_Some part of it dwells in everyone :_The Heavenly Eye through all our days_Shoots God's Will down in those bright White rays_In These Pyramids and Cones of The Dark Knights' Sun

The Conatus is truly not a con -_
Some part of it dwells in everyone :_
The Heavenly Eye through all our days_
Shoots God's Will down in those bright White rays_
In These Pyramids and Cones of The Dark Knights' Sun

dai repwblic = Dai Saw = David B Lawrence : the author asserts his moral right - not to sue for copyright !


It is assumed that the proliferation of triangles, cones and pyramids - in particular The Tetrahedron which is the most perfect of The Platonic Solids - and Iolo Morganwg's symbol for The Awen which depicts three heavenly rays as in The Enlightenment emblem of The Sunburst indicating The Heavenly Eye behind a clouded sky - which is akin to The Eye in The Pyramid of The Great Seal of The USA - are all punning imagery for the concept of The Conatus or that portion of God's Will planted within each of us which if we fulfill makes us happy and if frustrated makes us unhappy. Note that God's Will may not be the same for each person in The Divine Plan as it unfolds according to The Divine Law which governs not only are actions but our reactions. Imagine our lives to be like those vortices which emerge in a river as it flows and persist for a while and then come to an end.

Some lives are extremely limited in their scope but none are invalid : simple straightforwardedly turning lives are more likely to be happy lives and complex turbulent lives are more likely to be unhappy however celebrated. The Nomos governs our lives however they are lived - the rain falls on the rich and poor alike or does not if the rich person shares their umbrella with the poor person : if the rich person chooses not to then the consequences may be that the poor person is soaked and angry and steals the umbrella or destroys it and so they both end up soaked ... In terms of The Conatus as The Will of God then not doing it leads not only to self-harm but to harming those around us : society consists of a fabric made of many lives being interwoven together and to try to extricate ourselves from it is like deliberately pulling out a thread - the individual life is much weaker but the fabric itself is weakened also.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conatus

In early philosophies of psychology and metaphysics, conatus (/koʊˈneɪtəs/;[1] Latin for "effort; endeavor; impulse, inclination, tendency; undertaking; striving") is an innate inclination of a thing to continue to exist and enhance itself. This "thing" may be mind, matter or a combination of both. Over the millennia, many different definitions and treatments have been formulated. Seventeenth-century philosophers René Descartes, Baruch Spinoza, Gottfried Leibniz, and Thomas Hobbes made important contributions. The conatus may refer to the instinctive "will to live" of living organisms or to various metaphysical theories of motion and inertia. Often the concept is associated with God's will in a pantheist view of Nature ...

... The Latin cōnātus comes from the verb cōnor, which is usually translated into English as, "to endeavor"; but the concept of the conatus was first developed by the Stoics (333–264 BCE) and Peripatetics (c. 335 BCE) before the Common Era. These groups used the word ὁρμή (hormê, translated in Latin by impetus) to describe the movement of the soul towards an object, and from which a physical act results. Classical thinkers, Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 BCE) and Diogenes Laertius (c. 235 BCE), expanded this principle to include an aversion to destruction, but continued to limit its application to the motivations of non-human animals. Diogenes Laertius, for example, specifically denied the application of the term to plants. Before the Renaissance, Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274 CE), Duns Scotus (c. 1266–1308 CE) and Dante Alighieri (1265–1321 CE) expressed similar sentiments using the Latin words vult, velle or appetit as synonyms of conatus; indeed, all four terms may be used to translate the original Greek ὁρμή. Later, Telesius and Campanella extended the ancient Greek notions and applied them to all objects, animate and inanimate.

First Aristotle, then Cicero and Laertius each alluded to a connection between the conatus and other emotions. In their view, the former induces the latter. They maintained that humans do not wish to do something because they think it "good", but rather they think it "good" because they want to do it. In other words, the cause of human desire is the natural inclination of a body to augment itself in accordance with the principles of the conatus. ...

[ THERE IS A LOT TO READ ABOUT THE HISTORY OF IT E.G. DESCARTES & HOBBES ETC - BUT I LIKE SPINOZA ]

... Conatus is a central theme in the philosophy of Benedict de Spinoza (1632–1677). According to Spinoza, "each thing, as far as it lies in itself, strives to persevere in its being" (Ethics, part 3, prop. 6). Spinoza presents a few reasons for believing this. First, particular things are, as he puts it, modes of God, which means that each one expresses the power of God in a particular way (Ethics, part 3, prop. 6, dem.). Moreover, it could never be part of the definition of God that his modes contradict one another (Ethics, part 3, prop. 5); each thing, therefore, "is opposed to everything which can take its existence away" (Ethics, part 3, prop. 6, dem.). This resistance to destruction is formulated by Spinoza in terms of a striving to continue to exist, and conatus is the word he most often uses to describe this force. ...

... Spinoza, with his determinism, believes that man and nature must be unified under a consistent set of laws; God and nature are one, and there is no free will. Contrary to most philosophers of his time and in accordance with most of those of the present, Spinoza rejects the dualistic assumption that mind, intentionality, ethics, and freedom are to be treated as things separate from the natural world of physical objects and events. His goal is to provide a unified explanation of all these things within a naturalistic framework, and his notion of conatus is central to this project. For example, an action is "free", for Spinoza, only if it arises from the essence and conatus of an entity. There can be no absolute, unconditioned freedom of the will, since all events in the natural world, including human actions and choices, are determined in accord with the natural laws of the universe, which are inescapable. However, an action can still be free in the sense that it is not constrained or otherwise subject to external forces. ...

... Human beings are thus an integral part of nature. Spinoza explains seemingly irregular human behaviour as really "natural" and rational and motivated by this principle of the conatus. In the process, he replaces the notion of free will with the conatus, a principle that can be applied to all of nature and not just man.
...
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dai



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ns4enGCeQyk - Spinoza - 04 - Causality and Free-Will

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Vu4C04W52BQ - Spinoza - 05 - Conatus, Potentia and Desire

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5bX-H7dYoP0 -Spinoza - 06 - Affections and Affects: Joy, Sadness & Desire


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eJJEJ2ry2Pw - brief notes overview of Spinoza

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rTodfScfQ1s -Free Will & Determinism (BBC In Our Time)

Now to bed....


Last edited by dai on Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:42 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scanning links to the above -

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernardino_Telesio

Bernardino Telesio (Italian: [bernarˈdiːno teˈlɛːzjo]) (7 November 1509 – 2 October 1588) was an Italian philosopher and natural scientist. While his natural theories were later disproven, his emphasis on observation made him the "first of the moderns" who eventually developed the scientific method. ... The heterodox views which he maintained aroused the anger of the Church on behalf of its cherished Aristotelianism, and a short time after his death his books were placed on the Index. ... When Telesio went on to explain the relation of mind and matter, he was still more heterodox. Material forces are, by hypothesis, capable of feeling; matter also must have been from the first endowed with consciousness. For consciousness exists, and could not have been developed out of nothing. ...

... This leads him to a form of hylozoism. Again, the soul is influenced by material conditions; consequently the soul must have a material existence. He further held that all knowledge is sensation ("non ratione sed sensu") and that intelligence is, therefore, an agglomeration of isolated data, given by the senses. He does not, however, succeed in explaining how the senses alone can perceive difference and identity. ... ... The whole system of Telesio shows gaps in his argument, and ignorance of essential facts, but at the same time it is a forerunner of all subsequent empiricism, scientific and philosophical, and marks clearly the period of transition from authority and reason to experiment and individual responsibility. ...

[ NOW WHEN I FOUND OUT THAT THE NAME FOR MY BELIEFS IS " HYLOZOIST " I WAS VERY PLEASED NOT TO BE ENTIRELY ORIGINAL : I DO NOT BELIEVE IN PANPSYCHISM BECAUSE IT ASCRIBES THOUGHT TO STONES BUT SUBATOMIC PARTICLES DO APPEAR TO MAKE CHOICES AS TO HOW THEY COMBINE TOGETHER - LIFE IS NOT ABOUT REPRODUCTION PER SE AS ABOUT MAKING CHOICES - HENCE THE LINK TO THE CONATUS ]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hylozoism

Hylozoism is the philosophical point of view that matter is in some sense alive. The concept dates back at least as far as the Milesian school of pre-Socratic philosophers. The term was introduced to English by Ralph Cudworth in 1678. ... Although there is a distinction between possessing a mind (hylopsychism) and possessing life (hylozoism); in practice this division is difficult to maintain, because the ancient hylozoists not only regarded the spirits of the material universe and plant world as alive, but also as more or less conscious. Whereas animism tends to view life as taking the form of discrete spirits, and panpsychism tends to refer to strictly philosophical views like that of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, hylozoism refers largely to views such as those of the earliest Greek philosophers (6th and 5th centuries BC), who treated the magnet as alive because of its attractive powers (Thales), or air as divine (Anaximenes), perhaps because of its apparently spontaneous power of movement, or because of its role as essential for life in animals. Later this primitive hylozoism reappeared in modified forms. ...

... In the Renaissance, Bernardino Telesio, Paracelsus, Cardanus, and Giordano Bruno revived the doctrine of hylozoism.The latter, for example, held a form of Christian pantheism, wherein God is the source, cause, medium, and end of all things, and therefore all things are participatory in the ongoing Godhead. Bruno's ideas were so radical that he was entirely rejected by the Roman Catholic Church as well as excommunicated from a few Protestant groups, and he was eventually burned at the stake for various heresies. Telesio, on the other hand, began from an Aristotelian basis and, through radical empiricism, came to believe that a living force was what informed all matter. Instead of the intellectual universals of Aristotle, he believed that life generated form. ...

... Cudworth's Dutch friends had reported to him the views which Spinoza was circulating in manuscript. Cudworth remarks in his Preface that he would have ignored hylozoism had he not been aware that a new version of it would shortly be published. ... Spinoza's idealism also tends toward hylozoism. In order to hold a balance even between matter and mind, Spinoza in fact combined materialistic with pantheistic hylozoism, by reducing both to the rank of mere attributes of the one infinite substance. Although he specifically rejects identity in inorganic matter, he, like the Cambridge Platonists, sees a life force or living force within, as well as beyond, all matter. ...

... in our times, scientific hylozoism – whether modified, or keeping the trend to make all beings conform to some uniform pattern, to which the concept was adhered in modernity by Herbert Spencer, Hermann Lotze, and Ernst Heinrich Haeckel – was often called upon as a protest against a mechanistic view of the world. ... Haeckel upheld a unity of organic and inorganic nature and derived all actions of both types of matter from natural causes and laws. Thus, his form of hylozoism reverses the usual course by maintaining that living and non-living things are, essentially, the same and by erasing the distinction between the two and stipulating that they behave by a single set of laws. ...

... In contrast, the Argentine-German neurobiological tradition terms hylozoic hiatus all of the parts of nature which can only behave lawfully or nomically and, upon such a feature, are described as lying outside of minds and amid them – i.e.., extramentally. Thereby the hylozoic hiatus becomes contraposed to minds deemed able of behaving semoviently, i.e.. able of inaugurating new causal series (semovience). Hylozoism in this contemporary neurobiological tradition is thus restricted to the portions of nature behaving nomically inside the minds, namely the minds' sensory reactions (Christfried Jakob's "sensory intonations") whereby minds react to the stimuli coming from the hylozoic hiatus or extramental realm....

... Physicist Thomas Brophy, in The Mechanism Demands a Mysticism, embraces hylozoism as the basis of a framework for re-integrating modern physical science with perennial spiritual philosophy. Brophy coins two additional words to stand with hylozoism as the three possible ontological stances consistent with modern physics. Thus: hylostatism (universe is deterministic, thus “static” in a four-dimensional sense); hylostochastism (universe contains a fundamentally random or stochastic component); hylozoism (universe contains a fundamentally alive aspect) ...

[ WHICH.AGAIN LEADS TOWARDS THE CONATUS : THE WILL TO PERSIST AGAINST EVENTS TO PRESERVE LIFE ]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hylozoists

http://thehylozoists.com
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dai



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://criticallegalthinking.com/2015/03/16/conatus-political-being-and-spinoza/

Critical Legal Thinking - Law and the Political

Conatus: political being and Spinoza

by Stephen Connelly • 16 March 2015

Part I – The nature and significance of the conatus

Spinoza’s ‘conatus’ is a signal concept of his thought and one which appears as an axiom of modern treatments, particularly those of a political nature. Famously, the conatus doctrine provides:

Each thing insofar as it is in itself, endeavours to persevere in its being.

PROPOSITIO VI. Unaquaeque res, quantum in se est, in suo esse perseverare conatur.

Traditionally the source of this doctrine has been identified as an amalgam of Hobbes and Descartes. From Hobbes Spinoza takes the view that this endeavour is an infinitesimal striving which characterises (human) individuality and is the origin of consciousness; from Descartes he draws the idea that this striving is explicable in entirely rational terms as a kind of inertia. The result is a mechanisation of consciousness in which our lived duration is characterised by the struggle of continued being—the resistance to annihilation ... From this reading a characterisation of Spinoza’s philosophy flows in which all is struggle, an indefinite State of Nature in which Natural Right is regarded as a claim that ‘might makes right’ — each thing has as much natural right as it is actually able to exercise in the world. ...

[ A LONG ESSAY CRITICAL OF SPINOZA AND WORTH READING IF I HAD THE TIME - GOOD NIGHT ! ]
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It strikes me that the idea of Conatus could conceivably have something in common with the idea of Ego : a deflated ego depicts the self as being less than significant whereas an inflated ego depicts the self as being more than significant i.e. both are irrational views of the relationship between the self and other selves leading to unreasonable behaviours based upon un-real expectations. The Conatus as The Will of God for each person should always be rational and therefore reasonable so in a way it is about our understanding of our role in The World e.g. as caretakers
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 23, 2017 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It strikes me that the idea of Conatus could conceivably have something in common with the idea of Ego : a deflated ego depicts the self as being less than significant whereas an inflated ego depicts the self as being more than significant i.e. both are irrational views of the relationship between the self and other selves leading to unreasonable behaviours based upon un-real expectations. The Conatus as The Will of God for each person should always be rational and therefore reasonable so in a way it is about our understanding of our role in The World e.g. as caretakers not masters hence the destruction by Adam and Eve of The Garden of Eden when they acquire an imperfect understanding of The World and are " cast out " into a wilderness of their own making. The Conatus being The Will to Live or The Insinct for a Better Life is therefore what underlies the impulse to be political i.e. to make The World a better place to live in - the conceptions of how to do that or what is desired being the stuff of religion - hence The Public Discourse has its origins in that circle of consciousness : Sensation, Emotion, Cognition, Action - connected through paths which I label Spirituality, Religion, Politics, Economics, Science and Art - which translate into the ideological distortions of Liberalism, Anarchism, Communism, Conservativism, Socialism and Fascism.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daf I am struggling with it : can you get your head around what he is saying =

Thttp://criticallegalthinking.com/2015/03/16/conatus-political-being-and-spinoza/
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just having a random series of thoughts about Conatus being something akin to " The Will to Be " which brings up very few Google hits like this one -

http://saq.dukejournals.org/content/111/3/453.abstract

The Will to Be Otherwise/The Effort of Endurance
Elizabeth A. Povinelli
Abstract

This essay examines Michel Foucault’s reflections on self-formation in the shadow of the insurrection of subjugated knowledges. If, as Foucault argues in The Government of Self and Others, the conditions of the otherwise lie in the radically potential spaces of a kind of truth speaking (dire vrai, parrhesia), what political and theoretical weight will be given to the exhausting conditions of these spaces? The goal of this essay is not to solve this paradox ontologically, but to face it sociologically, not to develop an ontology of potentiality but to understand the dwelling of potentiality. The essay begins by examining will, risk, and exhaustion in Foucault’s late works, then turns Giorgio Agamben’s reflections on potentiality and thoughts on will, effort, and mental habit from the American pragmatists William James and Charles Sanders Peirce.

" The Will to Live " is a more popular concept -

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_to_live

The will to life or Wille zum Leben is a psychological force to fight for survival seen as an important and active process of conscious and unconscious reasoning. The German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer is the first to give name to this force existing in all of life forms. This occurs particularly when one’s own life is threatened by a serious injury or disease. The idea in which someone who is on the threshold of death may consciously or unconsciously try to stay alive through the belief that they have a reason or something to live for, along with giving up on the will to live. There are significant correlations between the will to live and existential, psychological, social, and physical sources of distress. The concept of the will to live can be seen as directly impacted by hope. Many, who overcome near-death experiences with no explanation, have described concepts such as the will to live as a direct component of their survival. The difference between the wish to die versus the wish to live is also a unique risk factor for suicide.

[ THE REST IS WORTH READING BUT NOT QUOTING ]

I am thinking about soap bubbles jostling in a bowl with their shapes defined by their juxtapositions as a metaphor for the Conatus of different individuals both compromised but complying with The Law which governs them : their shapes are not defects but consequences - our lives are not deformed but shaped by our circumstances.
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