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" GWELL ANGAU NA GWARTH "

 
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:49 pm    Post subject: " GWELL ANGAU NA GWARTH " Reply with quote

" GWELL ANGAU NA GWARTH " = " DEATH BEFORE -

DISHONOUR / SHAME / REPROACH / DISGRACE / SCANDAL ? "


I was thinking of calling this " The Culture in Wales of Rape " but the motto sort of widens the matter to martyrdom and also conscientious objection - but the motto is fairly widespread and can be found inscribed on military monuments and in heraldic achievements etc The following link to the coat of arms for Fenton gives no explanation as to why this family's heraldry has a Welsh motto - nor do other websites which I have examined which all say that the name is English -

https://www.houseofnames.com/fenton-family-crest

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/lifestyle/nostalgia/welsh-history-month-corris-roadside-3875512

Welsh History Month: Corris Roadside Memorial

What is the most important object in Welsh history? Today Professor Chris Williams, from Swansea University, argues the case for a Roadside Memorial, Corris

What unites a pink granite memorial next to the A487 as it passes above the Merionethshire village of Corris, a street in Ogmore Vale, and the macabre horrors invoked by the term “concentration camp”? The answer is, depending on your choice of terminology, the second Boer war, South African war or the Anglo-(not in Wales, please!)-Boer war of 1899-1902.

That was a conflict between Britain and the Boer republics of the Transvaal and Orange Free State. Britain won the war, eventually, but not without a fierce struggle involving many setbacks and difficulties, and not without committing to it what was at that time the largest army this country had ever put in the field. The war raged across southern Africa, an area roughly the size of western Europe, and involved the death of more than 20,000 servicemen from Britain and the Empire, of 35,000 Boers, most of them civilians who died of disease in the notorious “concentration camps”, and of 20,000 black South Africans, again most dying in the camps. ...

... [ IT IS A VERY INTERESTING ARTICLE : GO READ IT - PLEASE ] ...

... What made the South African war stand out was that most of its memorials were collective, and rooted in particular communities. Some were, in numbers commemorated, small, such as that to just six dead in the churchyard of St Deiniol’s, Hawarden in Flintshire.

A bronze life-size figure of a soldier in khaki saluted the nine men from Llanelli and district who had heard, in the language of the day, “the Empire’s call”, and whose relatives may or may not have been comforted by the monument’s inscription – “Gwell Angau Na Chywilydd” (Better Death than Dishonour). The message was almost identical in Carmarthen – “Gwell Angau Na Gwarth”.

The pride felt by Welsh communities in the sacrifices of their own is evident in much of the phraseology to be found on memorials. One memorial in Brecon is to two “Breconians who lost their lives”, that in Rhyl to six “men of Rhyl”, that in Holy Trinity, Llandudno to two “members of the guild of bellringers of this church”. ...

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Having some high-minded fool volunteer for martyrdom is of course always good for the cause which is why The People in Wales are always glad to see somebody else taking a noble stand at the wicket and facing a googly and ... mmm ... wrong sort of metaphor ... anyhow I took my mother to see this monument as a tease because her name was Dorothy Lawrence too ... the trouble with the Cymro-Norman surnames like Edwards, Williams, Hughs etc is that there are people all over Wales bearing these names and you might as well be called Jones ... Lawrence / Lawrance / Lawerance / Lorence / Lorens etc etc has its origins supposedly in 12c Breconshire when " The Butcher of Bronllys " one Laurens de Boulogne who was a third or fourth generation Norman - and therefore abolutely forbidden to marry any Welsh girls - exercised his " droit de seignure " on one Margared ferch ... um ... Vaughan ? ... anyway - he raped her - all nice an legal like - as a way of intimidating the peasants i.e. rape was used as a way of traumatising those conquered. The product of this crime was called Sion ap Lorens by his compatriots who tried to be nice to him but he was hard bitten by the injustice done to his mother whilst apparently his father actually tried to be nice to him. The history books of Wales are strewn with Lawrences in the roles ranging from the strong arm men who were mainly employed in expropriating the peasants up to the ranks of castellans, justiciars, constables and sheriffs who were responsible for hanging them. Hence I like to joke with Gethin and Sian who are all for Owain Glyndwr by pointing out that it was a Lawrence who defended Newport - and of course stood in the smouldering ruins of it raining down curses of Glyndwr's allies.

Why I am bothering to post the following is because I am one of those who believe that it takes centuries to eradicate - or at least significantly lessen - social evils and one of the notable evils not yet eradicated is rape. I think that we have to speculate as to whether the origins of Wales' rape culture lie in the far off culture of " droit de seignure " when rape was a legal recreation for the Norman conquerers of Wales, England and Scotland and from whence they took their sport into Ireland. Prior to the Marcher Lords The Women in Wales more or less had legal parity with The Men in Wales and afterwards their status steadily declined - as did the status of everybody wherever the Normans seized control of in order to exploit the lands which they conquered : theirs was an economic machine which stripped as much away as possible and treated The People in Wales as property : they literally " farmed " people - because what that word meant was the right to extract rents from those on the land, converting a free people settled on their own land into landless slaves forced to work in return for food - forced to surrender their wives and daughters for sport.

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From: David B Lawrence
Sent: 14 April 2017 12:49
To:
Subject: Monument to Dorothy Lawrence

Dear xxxx,

Perhaps an example of another member of my family foolishly making a stand for a strictly upright morality instead of sensibly running away - or just giving in and vaguely imagining that there might be a political solution afterwards ?

David B. Lawrence,

I think that it says

GWELL ANGAU NA GWARTH

THIS MONUMENT
WAS ERECTED BY
PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION
IN HONOURED MEMORY OF

ANNIE DOROTHY
LAWRENCE

THE BELOVED DAUGHTER OF
WILLIAM AND ALMA
LAWRENCE

OF ABERTRIDWR

WHO DIED AUGUST 17th 1908
YIELDING UP HER LIFE
RATHER THAN HER VIRTUE
AGED 19 YEARS

BLEST ARE THE PURE IN
HEART FOR THEY SHALL SEE GOD

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/16498755@N07/10331473073
http://www.ipernity.com/tag/594807/keyword/3677825
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/594807/30240903

http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/300021958-memorial-to-annie-lawrence-in-the-churchyard-of-st-ilan-eglwysilan-aber-valley

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=133804207

Annie Dorothy Lawrence

Birth: unknown
Death: Aug. 17, 1908, Wales

Murdered by Patrick Collins ( ex boyfriend.) Monument erected by public subscription. Died aged 19 years

Inscription:
Daughter of William & Alma Lawrence.
Yielding up her life rather than her honour.

Note: Patrick Collins executed by hanging at Cardiff prison December 1908.

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Laughing I HAD HEARD OF HER : ANOTHER DOROTHY LAWRENCE ... another Loony Lawrence ?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2537793/She-fought-Somme-disguised-Tommy-did-Dorothy-die-unloved-unlauded-lunatic-asylum-Incredible-story-British-woman-fight-trenches.html

She fought on the Somme disguised as a Tommy, so why did Dorothy die unloved and unlauded in a lunatic asylum? Incredible story of the only British woman to fight in the trenches

By Sarah Oliver for MailOnline 22:01, 11 January 2014

" In Paris, in the high summer of 1915, Dorothy Lawrence – a young Englishwoman with more by way of courage and ambition than wealth or connections – turned herself into a Tommy. ... And then Dorothy Lawrence, a cub reporter who hungered to be a war correspondent, cycled to Albert, the village known as the front of the Front, and joined the ranks of 179 Tunnelling Company, 51st Division, Royal Engineers, as they dug beneath no-man’s-land and across to German lines. ... They kept her presence a secret. ‘You don’t know what danger you are in,’ Sapper Tommy Dunn warned her, meaning from the battle-hardened, woman-starved men of her own side, not the enemy mortars. ... What he could not have known was the terrible secret which had driven Dorothy to take such risks. Ten years later she would reveal she had been raped as a child by the ‘highly respected’ church guardian who had raised her after she was orphaned. ...

... It was here she revealed the tragedy of her broken childhood to doctors – but there is no evidence her allegations were taken seriously and investigated as they would be today. ... It is even possible she was declared insane because she dared to air them publicly. A century ago the word of a man of the Church would have been believed over that of a woman capable of something The Spectator described in its September 1919 review of her book as a ‘girlish freak’. ... Dorothy was in hospital for a shocking 39 years until her lonely death in the asylum in 1964. She was buried in a pauper’s grave in New Southgate Cemetery, where the site of her plot is no longer clear. ... Military historian Simon Jones stumbled across a copy of her long-forgotten book while working at the Royal Engineers Museum in Chatham, Kent, ten years ago and is now writing her biography. ... ... ‘At the time she was committed her account of the rape was seen as manic behaviour, delusional, but if it was true it might go some way to explaining why she did what she did,’ Simon says.
‘We know today that victims of sexual abuse do not value their own wellbeing – did Dorothy deliberately put herself in danger? ... "

[ PLEASE GO READ THE WHOLE THING ]
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