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Henry More : Republicanism in his philosophical poetry ?

 
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 2636

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2015 2:03 pm    Post subject: Henry More : Republicanism in his philosophical poetry ? Reply with quote

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_More https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Conway,_Viscountess_Conway

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franciscus_Mercurius_van_Helmont https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gottfried_Wilhelm_Leibniz

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franciscus_van_den_Enden https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baruch_Spinoza

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Oldenburg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hooke

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragley_Hall https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Cudworth

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Alyngton [ OXFORD REALISTS V CAMBRIDGE PLATONISTS ] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambridge_Platonists

There is a taste of the dense connections in ' The Republic of Letters ' which was taking place circa 1650 as the age of Renaissance Republicanism came to an end and medieval Theism ceased to be credible as a means to construct the previously theological systems of thought which underpinned the ways of thinking about politics up until the end of The Wars of The Three Kingdoms which were later to be forged into The United Kingdom using the now all too familiar philosophical ideas of Neo-Classical Republicanism in the period 1650 - 1850 ... in which the ideas of John Locke came to be prominent if not popular because they suited the purposes of the monarchies brought to power by The Restoration in 1660 and The Glorious Revolution in 1688. John Locke, John Milton, Thomas Hobbes, Isaac Newton, John Evelyn, Samuel Pepys etc were all part of what became the in-group - whereas the out-group were the Republicans : but exactly what were the politics of those listed above ?

Henry More's close friend and patroness Lady Conway actually eventually opted into the out-group, allying herself to William Penn and the Quakers ( whom I am now sure should be identified as the last gasp of those sorts of Republicanism which used religiously based ideologies - forging the RSoF ( Qs ) were the Levellers, Diggers, Ranters and Seekers who were welded together into one organisation in order to organise against being persecuted.) Henry More's poetry from the 1640s suggests that he also held Republican sentiments but as these epic philosophical poems developed along with the historical events their subject matters and usages of language changed focus : either he changed his mind, or he became conscious of the tide turning ... in 1652 the Republicans ended up being crushed between the supporters of two opposing monarchies, one driven out of power under Charles Stuart - the other driving to reach out and overthrow the Republican government under Oliver Cromwell who eventually overthrew the Republican government by first quietly strangling it in its cradle and then declaring himself to be the ' Protector ' of its corpse, ' The Commonwealth.'

You can read several different things into Henry More's philosophical poems e.g. he foreshadows some of the kinds of debates being held in modern scientific discourses about the nature of the cosmos, about atomic theory two hundred years before Dalton and three hundred ears before the dispute between Quantum Physics and Einstein's followers who do not believe that ' God plays dice.' But use your imagination : here is a man who stands at the very end two hundred years of the ' White ' tradition of Republicanism in England in which ideas of how to develop the existing political system through arguments based on facts had reached their peak - and it appeared to be collapsing into pieces all around them ... their world had gone mad, and Republican ideas were being cited as the excuse for all manner crimes being committed by both sides in the English Civil Wars which had engulfed them during the 1640s : the Res Publica was being destroyed before their very eyes and whilst they were against the Monarchy, Aristocracy and Hierarchy which they criticised they were also participants of these powers, sympathetic to The People but also very frightened of the destructive potential of the much older power which was now threatening to assert itself - Democracy.

There is no easily grabbable copy on the internet to copy and paste, so I am just going to copy out by hand a few choice passages and leave you to read the rest from this scanned Victorian book which is available on-line -

https://archive.org/details/completepoemsofd00morerich

The complete poems of Dr. Henry More (1614-1687). For the first time collected and edited: with memorial-introduction, notes and illustrations, glossarial index, and portrait, &c. Rev Alexander B Grosart 1878 Chertsey Worthies' Library, Edinburgh University Press

https://archive.org/stream/completepoemsofd00morerich#page/n7/mode/2up

Ah ! - Perhaps this version will prove to be more useful for this task ...

https://ia600400.us.archive.org/12/items/completepoemsofd00morerich/completepoemsofd00morerich.pdf

... er ... no ?

... I am convinced that I am struggling with spyware plugged into the handy holes being provided by the software providers to the various security services ...

... could it be something like this ? ... http://www.computerworld.com/article/2529301/security0/sneaky-microsoft-plug-in-puts-firefox-users-at-risk.html ...

... GCHQ ... CIA ... MOSSAD ... whatever kinds of mechanical morons are inside my computers, they attack documents containing words which they do not recognise ...

' A PLATONICK SONG OF THE SOUL ' - ' Psychozoia ' - ' Psychathanasia ' - ' Antipsychopannychia ' - ' Antimonopsychia ' - ' Prjeexistency ' - oh ... surely ... no ... ?

... perhaps I was wrong to try this ? ... ' Prjeexistency ' ... surely - obviously - that has was is but been put into some Americanical Spilleg ...

https://ia700400.us.archive.org/12/items/completepoemsofd00morerich/completepoemsofd00morerich_djvu.txt

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


©ijcrtscg


3K&ortf)i


its'


Hifcrarg*


THE COMPLETE POEMS

®r. ^ enr V iWore

(1614-1687)



^Off THE FIRST TIME COIIECTED AND EDITED:

WITH MEMORIAL-INTRODUCTION, NOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS,

GLOSSARLAL INDEX, AND PORTRAIT &-c.



BY



The Rev. ALEXANDER B. GROSART, LL.D., F.S.A.

ST. GEORGE'S, BLACKBURN, LANCASHIRE.




PRINTED FOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION.

187S.



rHOMAS AND ARCHIBALD CONSTABLE, PRINTERS TO HER MAJESTY.

2>0 (o


To


EDWARD DOWDEN, Esq.

LL.D.
TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN.

D,

'OWDEN/ THE BOON I ASK, THOU WILT ALLOW-
TO LET THY NAME ADORN THESE LONG-DIMM'D PAGES;
WHICH I HAVE WORKED ON, FOR NO SORDID WAGES,

BUT IN REV'RENCE. MORE, IN THIS LIVING NOW

I WOULD RE-SHRINE FOR HOMAGE. 'TIS A VOW

OF LONG YEARS PAST. IN SUPREME BYGONE AGES,
HE STOOD IN THE FOREFRONT OF ENGLAND'S SAGES,

REVERED OF ALL. AS ARROW FROM THE BOW

HIS GREAT THOUGHTS SPED STRAIGHT TO MEN'S HEARTS ; AND SHOOK
GRAY SUPERSTITIONS, AS WITH STROKE OF LEVIN.

THE BOOKS REMAIN ; AND I DARE RISK REBUKE,
AS I AVOUCH THEM NOBLE AS WHEN GIVEN.

AS POET DARK— BUT AS A STARRY NIGHT,

OR LEAF-SCREEN'D BROOK, GLEAMING WITH FLECKS OF LIGHT.

ALEXANDER B. GROSART.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

... I think that I had better start that all over again ... let me try to anyway ...
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dai



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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2015 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

... It was something for a Poet to have had for
birthplace so renowned a spot. Every one
knows that few small towns (speaking com-
paratively) have so venerable and lustrous a
history to recount. ' Royalism ' must have
interpenetrated its very atmosphere, though
to-day — if we may subordinate Queens Editha,
Maud, Eleanor — its most memorable histori-
cal incident is the victory of one ' Colonel
Cromwell '
over far-outnumbering troops of
the King (Charles I.). In Literature it must
ever hold a place of honour ; for besides
Henry More, John Still (Bishop), author
of that drollest and quaintest of our elder
English Comedies, ' Gammer Gurton's
Needle' (1575), was also born in Grantham.
Supremest of all, to its School — from neigh-
bouring Woolsthorpe — came Isaac Newton,
as earlier Sir William Cecil. ...

... His uncle threatened him with the
birch if he did not acquiesce in the family
orthodoxy. It is easy to cry out against the
threat ; but doubtless it was directed against
the pertness and ' answering-back ' as much
as against the impugnment of the specific
opinion. Certes such matters were 'too high '
for the lad, and he had been a healthier man
every way had he not so prematurely ' inter-
meddled ' with the metaphysic of this prodi-
gious postulate, not of Calvinism or of the
Bible merely, but of universal nature and
human nature.
Here is his own narrative,
than which few more remarkable are to be
read : 1 —

' For the better Understanding of all this, we are
to take {saith he) our Rise a little higher ; and to pre-
mise some things which fell out in my Youth ; if not
also in my Childhood it self : To the End that it may
more fully appear, that the things which I have
written, are not any borrowed, or far-fetch'd Opinions,
owing unto Education, and the Reading of Books ;
but the proper Sentiments of my own Mind, drawn
and derived from my most intimate Nature ;
and that
every Humane Soul is no abrasa tabula, or mere
Blank Sheet ; but hath innate Sensations and Notions
in it, both of good and evil, just and unjust, true and
false ; and those very strong and vivid.
...

... I did (with my eldest Brother, who
then, as it happened, had accompanied my Uncle
thither) very stoutly, and earnestly for my Years, dis-
pute against this Fate or Calvinistiek Predestination,
as it is usually call'd : And that my Uncle, when he
came to know it, chid me severely ; adding menaces
withall of Correction, and a Rod for my immature
Forwardness in Philosophizing concerning such Mat-
ters :
Moreover, that I had such a deep Aversion in
my Temper to this Opinion, and so firm and unshaken
a Perswasion of the Divine Justice and Goodness :
that on a certain Day, in a Ground belonging to
ALton College, where the Boys us'd to play, and
exercise themselves, musing concerning these Things
with my self, and recalling to my mind this Doctrine
of Calvin, I did thus seriously and deliberately con-
clude within my self, viz. Lf I am one of those that are
predestinated unto Hell, where all Things are full of
nothing but Cursing and Blasphemy, yet will I behave
my self there patiently and submissively towards God ;
and if there be any one Thing more than another, that
is acceptable to him, that will I set my self to do with a
sincere Heart, and to the utmost of my Penver : Being
certainly persuaded, that if I thus demeaned my self,
he would hardly keep me long in that Place. Which
Meditation of mine, is as firmly fix'd in my Memory,
and the very place where I stood, as if the Thing
had been transacted but a Day or two ago. ...

... Yet that exceeding hail and entire Sense of GOD,
which Nature her self had planted deeply in me,

very easily silenced all such slight and Poetical Jubi-
lations as these. Yea even in my first Childhood,
an inward Sense of the Divine Presence was so strong
upon my Mind ; that I did then believe, there could
no Deed, Word, or Thought be hidden from him :
Nor was I by any others that were older than my
self, to be otherwise persuaded. Which Thing since
no distinct Reason, Philosophy, or Instruction taught
it me at that Age ; but only an internal Sensation
urg'd it upon me ;
I think it is very evident, that
this was an innate Sense or Notion in me, contrary
to some witless and sordid Philosophasters of our
present Age. And if these cunning Sophisters shall
here reply ; that I drew this Sense of mine ex Tra-
duce, or by way of Propagation, as being born of
Parents exceeding Pious and Religious ; I demand,
how it came to pass, that I drew not Calvinism also
in along with it ? For both my Father and Uncle,
and so also my Mother, were all earnest followers
of Calvin. But these Things I pass ; since men
Atheistically disposed cannot so receive them, as
I from an inward Feeling speak them.' ...

[ THERE IS QUITE A BIT MORE THERE BY MORE ON MORE ... YOU CAN SEE THAT HE WAS AKIN TO ' THE SEEKERS ' AND WAS THUS A MID 17c RADICAL ]

... self-dedicated to ' high thinking ' and
noble-living, as with Wordsworth in an after-
generation, he found abundant and unex-
pected friends and means, without need of
the greater Poet's ' Stamp-office ' drudgery,
in person or by deputy. He never had —
any more than Wordsworth — a doubt of the
rightness of the mode of life he had chosen. ...

... Thus then persuaded, and esteeming it what was
highly Fit, I immerse my self over Head and Ears
in the Study of Philosophy, promising a most wonder-
ful Happiness to my self in it. Aristotle therefore,
Cardan, Julius Scaliger, and other Philosophers of
the greatest Note, I very diligently peruse.
In
which, the Truth is, though I met here and there
with some things wittily and acutely, and sometimes
also solidly spoken ; yet the most seem'd to me
either so false or uncertain, or else so obvious and
trivial, that I look'd upon my self as having plainly
lost my time in the Reading of such Authors. And
to speak all in a Word, Those almost whole Four
Years which I spent in Studies of this kind, as to
what concern'd those Matters which I chiefly desired
to be satisfied about, (for as to the Existence of a God,
and the Duties of Morality, I never had the least
Doubt) ended in nothing, in a manner, but mere
Scepticism. ...

... only a brief Introduction for the better Understanding
the Occasion of writing my First Book ; It fell
out truly very Happily for me, that I suffer'd so great
a Disappointment in my Studies. For it made me
seriously at last begin to think with my self ; whether
the Knowledge of things was really that Supreme Feli-
city of Man ; or something Greater and more Divine
was : Or, supposing it to be so, whether it was to be
acquir'd by such an Eagerness and Intentness in the
reading of Authors, and Contemplating of Things ;
or by the Purging of the Mind from all sorts of Vices
whatsoever : Especially having begun to read now
the Platonick Writers, Marsilius Ficinus, Plotinus
himself, Mercurius Trismegistus ; and the Mystical
Divines ; among whom there was frequent mention
made of the Purification of the Soul, and of the
Purgative Course that is previous to the Illumina-
tive
; as if the Person that expected to have his
Mind illuminated of God, was to endeavour after
the Highest Purity. ....

[ WELL - HIGH MINDED AMBITIONS : HE WAS STILL YOUNG ...]

... if I may here freely speak my
Mind, before this Conflict between the Divine Will,
and our cum proper Will or Self-Love, there can no
certain Signs appear to us of this New Birth at all.
But this Conflict is the very Punctum saliens, or First
Motion of the New Life or Birth begun in us. As to
other Performances, whether of Morality or Religion,
arising from mere Self Love, let them be as Specious
or Goodly as you please, they are at best but as
Preparations, or the more refin'd Exercises of a sort
of Tlieological Hobbianisme. ...

... ' But to reach now at length the Scope I drive at ;
Not content with this short Epigram, I did after-
wards, about the Beginning of the Year 1640, com-
prise the chief Speculations and Experiences I fell into,
by persisting in the Enterprise before mention'd, in a
pretty full Poem call'd Psychozoia, or the Life of the
Soul : Stir'd up to it, I believe, by some Heavenly
Impulse of Mind j since I did it at that time with no
other Design, than that it should remain by me a
private Record of the Sensations and Experiences of
my own Soul.' ... 'I shall only advertise the Reader farther, That
though this first Poem of the Life of the Soul was
written in the Year 1640, when the Author was
between 25 and 26 Years of Age ; yet with some
more that he added concerning the Immortality, and
both against the Sleep and Unity of Souls, it came
not out till 1642, and then he tells us, at the Instiga-
tion of some Learned and Pious Friends, to whom he
had in private accidentally shew'd them. Nay, for
that first Piece, he several times, it seems, thought of
bunting it, lest it should fall into the Hands of others.
...

... ' Concerning which matter, it is not, I conceive,
for any that have not had some very considerable
Experiences of this kind to make a true Judgment :
Nor will I my self pretend to a sufficient Knowledge
or Experience of it. But it is not, I should think,
difficult to apprehend ; That a Man having once
rescued himself from the Obliquity and Captivity of
his own Self-will and Self-love, and got, so far as
even this Life suffers, from the Bondage of Corrup-
tion, into the Glorious Liberty of the Children of God ;
into a high State of Virtue and Divine Purity, with
a most. Free, Noble, Intelligent, and Universal Love
of God, and of the whole Creation
: I say, it is not
difficult to conceive, that the Life of such a Person,
especially of a Person of the Doctor's Parts and
Constitution, must needs be very highly Joyous and
Blessed. A Heart loosed from it self, is like a Ship
sailing in the midst of the Seas : And we having re-
covered our selves into the due Love of God, and of
one another, to a State of Freedom and Innocency ;
what remains, but to live in a most unspeakable
Peace, Liberty and Felicity for evermore ? ...

... 'The Doctor in his Book of Ethicks speaks of
some that, by a Divine Sort of Late, are Virtuous
and Good ;
and this is to a very great and Heroicai
Degree. And the same may seem by him to be in-
timated elsewhere, as coming into this World rather
for the Good of others, and by a Divine force, than
through their awn proper fault or any necessary and
immediate Congruity of their Natures. All which is
agreeable to that Opinion of Plato : That some descend
hither to declare the Being and Nature of the Gods ;
and for the greater Health, Purity, and Perfection of
this Lower World
. ...

...' I say {breaks he out in a Place of it) that a Free,
Divine, Universalis d Spirit is worth all.
How
lovely, how Magnificent a State is the Soul of Matt
in, when the Life of God inactuating her, shoots
her along with himself through Heaven and Earth ;
makes her Unite with, and after a Sort feel her
self animate the whole World, c><r. This is to be
become Dei-form, to be thus suspended, (not by
Imagination, but by Union of Life ; Ktvrpov Kivrpy
ffwaxpavra, joining Centres with God) and by a
sensible Touch to be held up from the clotty dark
Personality of this Compacted Body. Here is Love,
here is Freedom, here is Justice and Equity in the
Super-essential Causes of them. He that is here
looks upon All things as One ; and on himself, if he
can then Mind himself, as a part of the Whole.
...

[ NOW THE MODERN READER MAY FEEL LITTLE IN RESPECT OF THIS SORT OF CONCEPTION, BUT YOU CAN SURELY NOTE FROM WHERE THE CONCEPTIONS OF 18c REPUBLICANS CAME FROM ]

... And though he thus desir'd Nothing for
himself; yet was he Happily instrumental in the
doing Signal Services unto others
: Nor was any one
more ready to serve a Friend, or more Active therein,
than He was, whenever there was a good Oppor-
tunity offer'd him. ' ... And so he 'liv'd and died a private
Fellow of Christ's College in Cambridge ; '
having troops of friends and disciples, and
such correspondents among others as
Descartes and Van Helmont, but shrink-
ing from the ostentation and noise of the
world outside. Nevertheless he had quick
and practical sympathies with the poor and
the suffering. His Biographer tells us—
' His very Chamber-Door was a Hospital to
the Needy' (p. 85). ... Principal Tulloch has well
summed up his retired life— 'Such a life as More's
necessarily presents few points of contact with the
great events of his time. " He was so busy
in his chamber with his pen and lines as not
to mind much the bustles and affairs of the
world without." He did not occupy any
party position,
even in that indefinite sense
in which Whichcote and Cudworth may be
said to have done. He had no relations
with the statesmen of the civil war and the
Commonwealth, and never made, like his
friends, any prominent public appearance.
...
The air of a school, which was after all confined
to a narrow if influential sphere, is more pervad-
ing in his writings than in any of the others.
Christ College, with its books, is never far
out of sight ; and all the sweetness and
seclusion of Ragley, " the solemness of the
place, its shady walks and hills and woods,
where he lost sight of the world and the
world of him ' (Ep. ded. to Immortality of
the Soul) did not help to let the light of day
or the breath of the common air into his
" choice Theories," however they may have
assisted him in " finding them out " and
elaborating them. ...

... ' He profess'd with Tears in his Eyes ; That he had
with great Sincerity offer 'd what he had written to the
World ; and added this afterwards, That he had
spent all his Time in the State of those Words, Quid
Verum sit, cr= quid Bonum, quaro, &• rogo ; &-= in
hoc Omnis sum : That what is good, and what is true,
were the two great things that he had always sought
and enquir'd after, and was wholly indeed taken up
with them.


( from the introductory chapter written by - )

Alexander B. Grosart.

Tremynfa,
Penmaenmawr,
North Wales,
16th July 1878.


So as you can see, Alexander B Grosart was researching and writing this book during the sudden spike of Republicanism in Wales which occurred in the 1870s.

P.S. Grosart presumably did not know that Wordsworth became a paid informant and probably removed to the Post Office job in the Lake District to save himself from other Republicans ...


Last edited by dai on Sun Apr 05, 2015 9:18 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2015 9:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, this looks like it will be tedious work ... I wish that I had not begun this now ... I think that I will read the whole thing first with that flipping thingummy-jig ...

https://archive.org/stream/completepoemsofd00morerich#page/n7/mode/2up

PSYCHOZIA

the first part of

The Song of The Soul

containing

A Christiano-Platonicall

Display of Life

--------------------------

The Argument of

PSYCHOZOIA

or

The Life of The Soul

CANTO I

---------------------------

31

These danc't about : but some I did espie
That steady stood,
'mongst which there shined one,
More fairly shineth not the worlds great eye,
Which from his plenteous store unto the Moon
Kindly imparteth light, that when he's gone,
She might supply his place, and well abate
The irksome uglinesse of that foul drone,
Sad heavie Night ;
yet quick to work the fate
Of murd'red travellers,
when they themselves belate.

32

O gladsome life of sense that doth adore
The outward shape of the worlds curious frame !
The proudest Prince that ever Sceptre bore
(Though he perhaps observeth not the same)
The lowest hem doth kisse of that we name,
The stole of Vranore, these parts that won
To drag in dirty earth (nor do him blame)
These doth he kisse : why should he be fordone ?
How sweet it is to live ! what joy to see the Sunne !

33

But O what joy it is to see the Sun
Of Æons kingdomes, and th' eternall Day
That never night o'retakes ! the radiant throne
Of the great Queen, the Queen Vranura !
Then she gan first the Scepter for to sway,
And rule with wisdome, when Atuvus old ;
- Hence Ahad we him call, - did tie them tway
With nuptiall charm and wedding-ring of gold ;
Then sagely he the case gan to them thus unfold :

34

My first born Sonne, and thou my Daughter dear,
Look on your aged Sire, the deep abysse,
In which and out of which you first appear ;
I Ahad hight, and Ahad onenesse is :
Therefore be one ( his words do never misse )
They one became. I Hattove also hight,
Said he ; and Hattove goodnesse is and blisse :
Therefore in goodnesse be ye fast unite :
Let Unity, Love, Good, be measures of your might.

35

They straight accord : then he put on the ring,
The ring of lasting gold on Uranure ;
Then gan the youthfull lads aloud to sing,
Hymen ! O Hymen ! O the Virgin pure !
O holy Bride ! long may this joy indure.
After the song Atove his speech again
Renews. My Son, I unto thee assure
All judgement and authority soveraign ;
He spake as unto one : for one became those twain.


36

To thee each knee in Heaven and Earth shall bow,

And whatsoever wons in darker cell
Under the Earth : If thou thy awfull brow
Contract, those of the ^Ethiopian hell
Shall lout, and do thee homage ; they that dwell
In Tharsis, Tritons fry, the Ocean-god,
Iim and Ziim, all the Satyres fell
That in empse Ilands maken their abode :
All those and all things else shall tremble at thy rod.

37

Thy rod thou thalt extend from sea to sea.
And thy Dominion to the worlds end ;
All Kings shall vow thee faithfull fealty,
Then peace and truth on all the earth I'll send :

Nor moody Mars my metalls may mispend,
Of Warlike instruments they plow-shares shall
And pruning hooks efform.
All things shall wend
For th' best, and thou the head shalt be o're all :
Have I not sworn thee King ? true King Catholicall !

33

Thus farre he spake, and then again respired ;
And all this time he held their hand in one ;
Then they with chearfull look one thing desired.
That he nould break this happy union :
I happy union breake ? quoth he anon :
I Ahad ? Father of Community ?
Then they : That you nould let your hand be gone
Off from our hands : He grants with smiling glee :
So each stroke struck on earth is struck from these same
three.


39

These three are Ahad, Æon, Uranore :
Ahad these three in one doth counite.
What so is done on earth, the self-same power
( Which is exert upon each mortall wight )
Is joyntly from all these. But she that hight
Fair Uranore, men also Psyche call.
Great Psyche men and Angels dear delight,
Invested in her stole æthereall,
Which though so high it be, down to the earth doth fall.

--------------------------------------------

The Argument of

PSYCHOZOIA,

or

The life of The Soul.

CANTO II.

6

My mind is mov'd dark Parables to sing
Of Psyches progeny that from her came,
When she was married to that great King.
Great Æon, who just title well may claim
To every soul, and brand them with his name.
Its He that made us, and not our own might :
But who, alas ! this work can well proclaim ?
We silly sheep cannot bleat out aright
The manner how : but that that giveth light is light.

7

Then let us borrow from the glorious Sun
A little light to illustrate this act.
Such as he is in his solstitial Noon,
When in the Welkin there's no cloudy tract
For to make grosse his beams, and light refract.
Then sweep by all those Globes that by reflexion
His long small shafts do rudely beaten back,
And let his rayes have undenied projection,
And so we will pursue this mysteries retection.

8

Now think upon that gay discoloured Bow : [ rainbow = end of destruction / peace - this was published 1647 ]
That part that is remotest from the light
Doth duskish hew to the beholder show ;
The nearer parts have colour farre more bright,
And next the brightest is the subtle light ;
Then colours seem but a distinct degree
Of light now failing ; such let be the sight
Of his farre spreaden beams that shines on high :
Let vast discoloured Orbs close his extremitie,

...

II

Therefore those different hews through all extend
So farre as light : Let light be every where :
And every where with light distinctly blend
Those different colours which I nam'd whilere
The Extremities of that farre shining sphear.
And that far shining sphear, which Centre was
Of all those different colours, and bright chear,
You must unfasten ;
so o'respred it has,
Or rather deeply fill'd with Centrall sand each place.

... [ IT IS A REALLY ENJOYABLE SYMBOLIC STORY - BUT I AM JUST SEARCHING FOR THE STUFF WHICH WAS CARRIED FORWARD INTO THE 18c AND THERE SECULARISED ... now here a bit when he decries Democrats ... ]

121

Thus in my youth, said Mticmon, did I use
With Reverend Ignorance to sport and toy,
Aud slily would obnoxius Age abuse ;
For I was a crank wit, a brisk young boy ;
But naturally abhorr'd hypocrisie,
And craft the upshot of experienc'd Age ;
And more then life I lov'd my liberty,
And much suspected all that would engage
My heart to their own sect, and free-born soul encage.

122

For I ev'n at those years was well aware
Of mans false friendship, and grown subtilty,
Which made me snuf the wind, drink the free aire
Like a young Colt upon the mountains high,
And turning tail my hunters all defie.
Ne took I any guide but th' innate light
Of my true Conscience, whose voice to deny,
Was the sole sting of my offended spright :
Thus God and Nature taught their rude Cosmopolite. [ Cosmopolitan = A Citizen of The World = A Republican ]

123

I mean not Natures harsh obdurate light,
The shamelesse eye-brows of the Serpent old,
That arm'd with custome will not stick to fight
With God and him affront with courage bold :
But that sweet temper we may oft behold
In virgin Youth as yet immaculate,
And unto drudging Policy unfold,
Who do without designe, now love, now hate
And freely give and take withouten price or rate. [ Could be Charles 1st or Cromwell or both ? ]

124

Dear lads ! How do I love your harmelesse years
And melt in heart while I the Morning-shine
Do view of rising virtue which appears
In your sweet faces, and mild modest eyne.
Adore that God that doth himself enshrine
In your untainted breasts ; and give no eare
To wicked voice that may your souls encline
Unto false peace, or unto fruitlesse fear,
[ It proved to be a false peace.]
Least loosened from your selves Harpyes away you bear.

125

Abstain from censure, seek and you shall find,
Drink your own waters drawn from living well,
Mend in your selves what ill elsewhere you mind,

Deal so with men as you would have them deal,
Honour the Aged that it may go well
With you in Age : For I my self indeed
Have born much scorn for these pranks, I you tell,
By boyes oft bearded, which I deem the meed
Of my abusive youth. But now I will proceed. [ More is advising his divided students ? ]

126

By this we came into a way that did
Divide it self into three parts ; the one [ The War of The Three Kingdoms ? ]
To Leontopolis ; that in the mid
Did lead straight forth out of wide Beiron,
That was the way that I mought take alone ;
The third way led unto Onopolis,
And thitherward Don Psittaco put on.
With both these towns Alopecopolis
Is in firm league, and golden Myrmecopolis.

127

For nothing they attempt without the aid
Of these two Cities. They'll not wagen war, [ Two cities - London and Edinburgh ? ]
Nor peace conclude nor permit any trade,
Nor make decrees, nor shake the civil jar, [ Wage another civil war ? They did.]
Nor take up private wrongs, nor plead at bar,
Nor Temples consecrate, nor Mattins say ;
They nought begin divine or secular,
But they advisen with those Cities tway.
O potent Citizens that bear so great a sway !

128

No truth of justice in Be'irah lond : [ lond ? London ? Is Be'irah England ? ]
No sincere faith void of slie subtility,
That alwayes seeks it self, is to be found ;
But law delusion and false Polity,
False Polity that into Tyrannie
Would quickly wend, did not stern Fear restrain
And keep in awe. Th' Onites Democracy
Is nought but a large hungry tyrant-train :
Oppression from the poore is an all-sweeping rain.


129

A sweeping torrent that beats down the corn,

And wasts the oxens labour, head-long throws
The tallest trees up by the root ytorn,
Its ranging force in all the land it shows ;
Woods rent from hence, its rowling rage bestows
In other places that were bare before,
With muddied arms of trees the earth it strows ;
The list'ning shepherd is amazed sore,
While it with swift descent so hideously doth rore.

130

Such is the out-rage of Democracie,
When fearlesse it doth rule in Be'irah :
And little better is false Monarchy,
When it in this same countrey bears the sway.

( Is't not a part of Autæsthia ? )
So to an inward sucking whirlpools close
They change this swelling torrents surquedry,
Much treasure it draws in, and doth inclose
In 'ts winding mouth, but whither then, there's no man knows.


131

O falsest Beironites, what gars you plain
One of another, and vainly accuse,
Of foul offence ? when you all entertain
Tyrannick thoughts. You all alike do muse
Of your own private good, though with abuse
Of those you can tread down with safety,
No way to wealth or honour you refuse.

False Onople doth grudge, and grone, and cry,
Because she is denied a greater tyranny.


132

Two of that City whylom on the way,
With languid lugs, and count'nance gravely sad,
Did deeply sigh, and rudely rough did bray
'Gainst Leontopolis. The equall pad
Of justice now, alas ! is seldome trad,
Said they ; The Lions might is law and right.
Where's love or mercy now ? with that out strad
A little dog, his dames onely delight,
And ran near to their tails, and bark'd with all his might. [ Could be the Queen's favourite, Prince Rupert compounded with his famous poodle ? ]

133

The surly irefull Onopolitan
Without all mercy kickt with yron heel
The little bawling curre, that at him ran ; [ perhaps the curre is Parliament ?]
It made his feeble corse to th' earth to reel,
That was so pierc'd with the imprinted steel,
That it might grieve a heart of flinty stone.
No herbs, no salves the breach could ever heal ;
The good old wife did then keep house alone,
False hearted carles, is this your great compassion ? [ = Charles 1st ? = ' ono-politan ' ? ]

134

There's no society in Behirah
But beastlike grazing in one pasture ground.
No love but of the animated clay
With beauties fading flowers trimly crown'd,
Or from strong sympathies heart-striking stound,
No order but what riches strength and wit
Prescribe. So bad the good eas'ly confound.
Is Honesty in such unruly fit
That it's held in no rank? they 'steem it not awhit. [ The old order of society is overturned : both honesty and the peerage is contempted ? ]

135

But I am weary of this uncouth place ;
[ = Behirah ? = England ? ]
If any man their bad condition
And brutish manners listeth for to trace ;
We may them read in the creation
Of this wide Sensible ; where every passion
Of birds and beasts distinctly do display
To but an ord'nary imagination,
The life and soul of them in Behirah :
This Behirah that hight the greater Adamah.

136

The swelling hatefull Toad, industrious Ant,
Lascivious Goat, Parrot, or prating Py, [ ' pie-bald ' ? a mongrel pony, black and white = the gutter press ?]
The kingly Lion, docil Elephant,
All-imitating Ape, gay Butterfly,
The crafty Fox famous for subtilty, [ = Machiavelli ? ]
Majestick Horse, the beast that twixt two trees
( A fit resemblance of foul gluttonny ) [ = the armies' thieving quarter-masters ?]
When he hath fil'd his gorge, himself doth squeeze
To feed afresh, Court Spaniels, and politick Bees ; [ = Cavaliers and the New Model Army's Political Radicals ? ]

137

With many more which I list not repeat ;
Some foul, some fair : to th' fair the name they give
Of holy virtues ; but 'tis but deceit, [ The New Model Army sectaries claim God on their side - but commit atrocities ? ]
None in Beiron virtuously do live ;
None in that land so much as ever strive
For truth of virtue, though sometimes they wont,
As Swine do Swine, their own blood to relieve.
Beiron s all bruits, the true manhood they want,
If outward form you pierce with phansie fulminant.


... [ NOW I THINK THAT IS A MAN WHO HATES WAR TALKING : HE HAD WITNESSED HIS STUDENTS TAKING SIDES AND KILLING THEIR FRIENDS ]


138

So having got experience enough
Of this ill land, for nothing there was new,
My purpose I held on, and rode quite through
That middle way, and did th' extremes eschew. [ A very Republican sentiment.]
When I came near the end there was in view
No passage : for the wall was very high,
But there no doore to me it self did shew :
Looking about at length I did espy
A lively youth, to whom I presently gan cry.

139

More willing he's to come then I to call :
Simon he hight, who also's cal'd a Rock :
Simon is that obedientiall
Nature, who boysterous seas and winds doth mock ;
No tempest can him move with fiercest shock ;
The house that's thereon built doth surely stand :
Nor blustring storm, nor rapid torrents stroke
Can make it fall ; it easily doth withstand
The gates of Death and Hell, and all the Stygian band.

140

When I gan call, forthwith in seemly sort
He me approch'd in decent russet clad, [ brownish red = a humble honest working man, not a soldier.]
More fit for labour then the flaunting Court.
When he came near, in chearfull wise he bad
Tell what I would : then I unto the lad
Gan thus reply ; alas ! too long astray
Here have I trampled foul Behirons pad :
Out of this land I thought this the next way,
But I no gate can find, so vain is mine assay.
[ How do you undo the consequences of a civil war - or any war ? ]

141

Then the wise youth, Good Sir, you look too high :
The wall aloft is rais'd ; but that same doore
Where you must passe in deep descent doth lie :
But he bad follow, he would go before.
Hard by there was a place, all covered o're
With stinging nettles and such weedery,
The pricking thistles the hard'st legs would gore,
Under the wall a straight doore we descry ;
The wall hight Self-conceit ; the doore Humility.

[ NOW THAT IS NOT THE END OF CANTO II BUT I AM TIRED ... AND I SEE NO TIME AHEAD WHEN I WILL FINISH THIS EXERCISE - BUT YOU CAN ALWAYS READ THESE POEMS FOR YOURSELVES ... ]
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