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Roger Morrice (1628–1702) first investigative journalist

 
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2016 10:00 pm    Post subject: Roger Morrice (1628–1702) first investigative journalist Reply with quote

I have just been glogolling " Roger Morris 17c journalist " because I the name was being mentioned in a history programme whilst I was doing other things like staring at the floor ... I got the point that he has only recently become significant because nobody had previously deciphered his handwriting so I immediately identified with him ... so I am now going to try to find out a bit more : care to join in Daf ? ... You may like this guy - ferociously anti-Catholic, approved of armed revolutions by suitably qualified people - and hated Tories ?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/civil_war_revolution/diaries_01.shtml

Diaries of the Seventeenth Century - By Dr Mark Knights

In 1656 John Beadle, an Essex minister, wrote an advice manual on how to keep a diary and explained the variety of types that were written in the seventeenth century ... over the C17th diary-writing seems to have become a common genre that covered a multiplicity of different functions. ... we should not look for one single factor explaining the rise of diary-keeping over the seventeenth century. Indeed we should consider growing literacy rates and a more literate culture, changes in the education system, cheaper paper and a heightened awareness of the 'self'. ... The most common reason for keeping a diary in the seventeenth century was to keep an account of providence or God's ordering of the world and of individual lives. ... In an age when life in this world and salvation in the next were both uncertain, diaries were a way of making sense of and ordering existence. ... The diary of Roger Lowe, for example, who refused to conform to the re-established church, allows us to picture a later seventeenth century mercer's apprentice living in a Lancashire village. We learn how prized his literacy was to his local community and how he acquired social importance through the sometimes quite unusual writing services he offered to his neighbours. ... An awareness of the importance of national events also seems to have triggered the activities of Roger Morrice, who began to keep an 'entring book' in 1678 after the revelation of a Popish Plot to assassinate Charles II and re-establish catholicism. Morrice, in one of the great unpublished journals of the later seventeenth century, continued to keep his register of public events until 'popery' was finally shaken off in the Revolution of 1688. ...

... The revolution in the north of England was nevertheless seen as a trick of a different kind by a Leeds dissenter, Ralph Thoresby. His account tells us about a popular rather than a noble revolution, accomplished through rumour and panic rather than William's invasion : ... 'we underlings knew not what to make of these affairs ... only I cannot omit the dreadful alarm of the flying army of Irish and massacring Papists, who with unheard-of cruelty burnt and killed all before them ... all the artificers, even the most precise, spent the next, though the Lord's day (16th December) in mending the fire-arms of such as had any and fixing scythes in shafts (desperate weapons) for such as had none'. ... This experience deeply colours the account of the very well informed presbyterian Roger Morrice, who was close to the presbyterian leaders in London. His suspicions of the church hierarchy - the very men who now ironically seemed to be standing up to popery - shaped his view of the revolution. ... Just before William entered the capital, Morrice confided to his journal that he feared men 'to be laying a foundation upon a narrow bottom for Toryisme, again to the exclusion of the true Reformed interest in the kingdome, and for restoring the Hierarchy to its zenith'. ... For Morrice the revolution was a struggle with a perfidious set of churchmen, from whom ease for dissenters might, with William's aid, finally be extracted or forced. ...


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Morrice

Roger Morrice (1628–1702) was an English Puritan minister and political journalist. He is most noted for his Entring Book, a manuscript diary which provides a description of society in the years 1677 to 1691. The manuscript is held by Dr Williams's Library in London, and in 2007 the Boydell Press published a 6 volume edition of the text.

Little is known about Morrice's life. He was born in about 1628 and died in 1702. He studied at St Catharine's College, Cambridge, and later became the vicar of Duffield in Derbyshire in 1658.[1] Because of his Non-conformist views he was ejected from his living at the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, going on to become a private chaplain to Denzil Holles and John Maynard, both veteran Parliamentarians.

Though Morrice reveals virtually nothing about himself in his diaries, his Entring Book is a particularly useful source document for London life and politics from the late 1670s to the early 1690s – as informative, in its own way, as the better known Diaries of Samuel Pepys. Morrice himself was a puritan clergyman who became a close associate of those opposed to the forms of absolute government favoured by the later Stuart kings, Charles II and his brother and successor, the Catholic James II. Most of the early part of the Entring Book is concerned with the possible impact of resurgent Catholicism on English liberties. For Morrice, the Tories, the party of the Court, were not so much a rival to the Whigs, with whom he identified, but 'conspiracy against the Reformed interest.' After the Glorious Revolution of 1688, in which James was replaced by William and Mary, Morrice is anxious to detect signs of Jacobitism in the ranks of those whom he refers to as 'the hierarchical party.'

Besides high politics, Morrice's journal has a lot to say about other aspects of contemporary life: from military and legal affairs, to printing, firework carnivals, storms, hurricanes, duels, executions, suicides and many other similar delights.

[ I NEED TO GO TO BED : CARE TO DO SOME FURTHER RESEARCH DAF ? ]
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Moritz



Joined: 10 Mar 2014
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2016 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
December 1688
During the Revolution, the London mob destroy the "popish mass houses":
"The Mob was up in most parts of the Town all Tuesday night and committed many tumultuous insolencies, and made an invasion upon Liberty and Property to the great grief of all Wise men, and to the great Scandall of the City. They gathered together in the evening about most of the known Masshouses in Town (the Ambassadors Chappells that were open and publick not escaping) and particularly about the Masshouse in Lyncolns Inn Fields. They tooke out of those Mass-Chappells all the furniture, Utensills, and combustable materialls and brought them into the Streete and there burnt them. They have since pulled down, burnt and carryed away all the Timber in most of them and the Girders and Joysts. They were pulling up the ground Joysts on Tuesday night about midnight and multitudes were carrying away Bricks in baskets so that they have left scarce any thing but the bare Walls. They have seized upon and exposed to Rapine all the rich furniture and Plate in the Spanish Ambassadors house, and the Treasures of severall Papists that were deposited with him."December 1688
During the Revolution, the London mob destroy the "popish mass houses":
"The Mob was up in most parts of the Town all Tuesday night and committed many tumultuous insolencies, and made an invasion upon Liberty and Property to the great grief of all Wise men, and to the great Scandall of the City. They gathered together in the evening about most of the known Masshouses in Town (the Ambassadors Chappells that were open and publick not escaping) and particularly about the Masshouse in Lyncolns Inn Fields. They tooke out of those Mass-Chappells all the furniture, Utensills, and combustable materialls and brought them into the Streete and there burnt them. They have since pulled down, burnt and carryed away all the Timber in most of them and the Girders and Joysts. They were pulling up the ground Joysts on Tuesday night about midnight and multitudes were carrying away Bricks in baskets so that they have left scarce any thing but the bare Walls. They have seized upon and exposed to Rapine all the rich furniture and Plate in the Spanish Ambassadors house, and the Treasures of severall Papists that were deposited with him."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1559404/Extracts-Entring-Book-of-Roger-Morrice.html is the 17th link on Google to Morrice. It has a couple of quotes. All the other links are either "this thing exists" or "buy this thing". There is nothing to research.

END THREAD
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2016 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

END THREAD ???

https://www.amazon.com/Entring-Book-Roger-Morrice-1677-1691/dp/1843834308

The Entring Book of Roger Morrice (1677-1691): Complete set with Index - Mark Goldie

Compiled between the years 1677 and 1691, the Entring Book is 900,000 words long, with many sensitive passages written in a secret shorthand that has only recently been decoded. This remarkable chronicle of public affairs has remained for nearly three centuries, secure but little known, in Dr Williams's Library, London. The Entring Book fits no simple definition. It is not just a political diary, nor is it only the newsletter it sometimes resembles. It's possible that it could have been the material for a history of Morrice's own times, or it may have been a letterbook, recording correspondence to an unnamed recipient. Writing in great detail, with meticulous regularity, Morrice may have been passing on all he knew to senior figures in the opposition to Charles II and James II. The Entring Book's enormous scope means it also covers publishing, plays, business, military and religious matters, foreign affairs, public opinion and London life, making it an essential resource. Through it we can trace the transformation of puritanism into Whiggery and Dissent. This seven volume set includes an introductory and an index volume as well as a biographical encyclopedia of names.

BUT I DO AGREE : PRECIOUS LITTLE TO GO ON ... may I humbly offer this as relevant scene setting?

http://xiarhos.weebly.com/uploads/8/1/7/2/8172582/religion_in_glorious_revolution.pdf

https://www.routledge.com/Fear-Exclusion-and-Revolution-Roger-Morrice-and-Britain-in-the-1680s/McElligott/p/book/9780754656821

Fear, Exclusion and Revolution : Roger Morrice and Britain in the 1680s - Edited by Jason McElligott ... 2006 – Routledge

About the Book

Between the years 1677 and 1691 the Puritan minister Roger Morrice compiled an astonishingly detailed record of public affairs in Britain. Running to almost a million words his 'Entring Book' provides a unique record of late seventeenth-century political and religious history. It charts the rise of British party politics, and the transformation of Puritanism into 'Whiggery' and Dissent. It provides a wealth of information on social and cultural history, as well as the relationships between the three Stuart kingdoms. All the essays in this volume have been inspired by the key concerns of the Entring Book: the palpable sense of the fear and foreboding in the 1680s; the long shadow cast by the mid-century civil war; the profound effect on Englishmen of events on the continent; and the anxieties and opportunities caused by a socially diffuse culture of news and information. In so doing they give a vivid sense of what it was like to live in England in the years before the Revolution and help to explain why that Revolution took place when it did, and why it took the particular form that it did. These chapters provide fresh and insightful perspectives on religion, politics and culture from established and emerging scholars on three continents. Taken together they offer a valuable introduction to the world of Roger Morrice, and will be an essential companion to the scholarly edition of the Entring Book.

Reviews

’In this user-friendly edition, the 'Entring Book' is a long overdue gift to scholars of late seventeenth-century England. It is a gold mine of notes, news, and reflections on the political, religious, cultural, and social events, as well as on individuals, during fourteen critically important years… This collection of wide-ranging essays effectively brings fresh questions and perspectives to understanding the decade of the 1680s. It will be of value to graduate students as well as their mentors, and to others interested in innovative approaches to Restoration England.’ Journal of British Studies ’There are no duds in this collection… none of the essays are less then original, scholarly and lucid. Each of these essays will find a distinct audience, but the whole collection will be required reading for any serious student of the 1680s.’ Ecclesiastical History ’Ashgate is to be congratulated on this volume which makes me wish I had attended the conference… That the book under review delivers such an insight into this world derives not only from the success of the editor and contributors in producing a tightly woven, scholarly and well-written collection but equally from the idea of focusing it upon a single massive primary source: the manuscript 'Entring Book' of nonconformist cleric Roger Morrice…’ English Historical Review ’As a snapshot of scholarship in the Restoration era, the volume is quite excellent. Individual contributions update and question our understanding of key areas, including the nature and role of an emerging public sphere, political structures in the first age of party, the genres of writing used to debate the fundamental issues of religion and constitution, and the place of England in a wider world.’ 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era.

[ YES I FEEL LAZY HAVING DONE THAT - BUT THEY CAN HARDLY COMPLAIN ABOUT IT BEING ADVERTISED ]


A snip at £199 - https://boydellandbrewer.com/the-entring-book-of-roger-morrice-1677-1691-hb.html

http://comicvine.gamespot.com/solomon-kane/4005-16222/

I WONDER WHAT HE LOOKED LIKE ... YOU LIKE THIS SORT OF PURITAN STUFF - I THOUGHT ?



... AND I LIKE DANIEL KHAN - " ON SUNDAY - AFTER THE WAR "

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=z6As3xIo_U8


Last edited by dai on Tue Sep 27, 2016 12:40 am; edited 1 time in total
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Moritz



Joined: 10 Mar 2014
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2016 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
December 1688
During the Revolution, the London mob destroy the "popish mass houses":
"The Mob was up in most parts of the Town all Tuesday night and committed many tumultuous insolencies, and made an invasion upon Liberty and Property to the great grief of all Wise men, and to the great Scandall of the City. They gathered together in the evening about most of the known Masshouses in Town (the Ambassadors Chappells that were open and publick not escaping) and particularly about the Masshouse in Lyncolns Inn Fields. They tooke out of those Mass-Chappells all the furniture, Utensills, and combustable materialls and brought them into the Streete and there burnt them. They have since pulled down, burnt and carryed away all the Timber in most of them and the Girders and Joysts. They were pulling up the ground Joysts on Tuesday night about midnight and multitudes were carrying away Bricks in baskets so that they have left scarce any thing but the bare Walls. They have seized upon and exposed to Rapine all the rich furniture and Plate in the Spanish Ambassadors house, and the Treasures of severall Papists that were deposited with him."December 1688
During the Revolution, the London mob destroy the "popish mass houses":
"The Mob was up in most parts of the Town all Tuesday night and committed many tumultuous insolencies, and made an invasion upon Liberty and Property to the great grief of all Wise men, and to the great Scandall of the City. They gathered together in the evening about most of the known Masshouses in Town (the Ambassadors Chappells that were open and publick not escaping) and particularly about the Masshouse in Lyncolns Inn Fields. They tooke out of those Mass-Chappells all the furniture, Utensills, and combustable materialls and brought them into the Streete and there burnt them. They have since pulled down, burnt and carryed away all the Timber in most of them and the Girders and Joysts. They were pulling up the ground Joysts on Tuesday night about midnight and multitudes were carrying away Bricks in baskets so that they have left scarce any thing but the bare Walls. They have seized upon and exposed to Rapine all the rich furniture and Plate in the Spanish Ambassadors house, and the Treasures of severall Papists that were deposited with him."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1559404/Extracts-Entring-Book-of-Roger-Morrice.html is the 17th link on Google to Morrice. It has a couple of quotes. All the other links are either "this thing exists" or "buy this thing". There is nothing to research.

END THREAD
_________________
Liberty - Equality - Fraternity : Aux armes, Citoyens !

War is Politics by other Methods - General von Clausewitz
Politics is War by other Methods - Some guy on the Internet
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 2637

PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2016 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh really ... deny a broken down old fart his only pleasure why don't you ?
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