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The Allure of Napoleon

 
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:05 pm    Post subject: The Allure of Napoleon Reply with quote

" The Allure of Napoleon " is the name of this exhibition -

http://www.yorkshire.com/view/events/barnard-castle/the-allure-of-napoleon-2060277

" Featuring outstanding artworks held in the Museum’s collection, the display will offer the opportunity to learn more about the Founders’ interest in Napoleon and his times. It will also inaugurate the celebrations for the 125th anniversary of The Bowes Museum in 2017. " ... Barnard Castle is oop nerth sumweyz ... and of course Napoleon was basically over-compensating for not having been born in England ... or it was perhaps vice versa ... you often can help but feel that were it not for a conspiracy of Southerners all Northerners would be Napoleons ... or Josephines ... and the natural borders of Yorkshire are after all most likely to run to just short of Moscow, Madrid and Cairo ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-nH3DN-ubE

... Now if we could stir up The Tykes in Yorkshire and persuade them to stop squabbling with The Geordies and The Yonners and The Yarkos and The Yessers and The Yams and The Yackers and The Yickers and The Brummies and The Jugs and The Trotters and The Sprites and The Steamies and The Jocks and The Janners and The Gawdivers and The Chippies and The Dolies and The Dingers and The Willikins and The Goolies and The Cods and The Chavs and The Hams and The Monkey Hangers and The Terries and The Tin Hats and The Yellow Tails and The Tosies and The Cork Heads and The Loiners and The Chishits and The Lolly Gobblers and The Yellow Tails and The Black Bitches and The Scousers and The Woolly Backs and The Shandies and The Mankies and The Stags and The Damned Scabs and The Smoggies and The Jack Doors and The Cow Jockies and The Dabbers and The Black Jacks and The Maggies and The Gogs and The Magogs and The Bumkins and The Dumplins and The Boggers and The Codders and The Rough Heads and The Buddies and The Blue Tuners and The Pompeyshites and The Chuckle Brothers and The Stoned Crows and The Mud Larks and The Sweaties and The Sooters and The Deedars and The Dancers and The Mush Scum and The Sand Grinders and The Stokies and The Stroodles and The Mackems and The Cat Catchers and The Jacks and The Moon Rakers and The Dookers and The Telfers and The Trogs and The Wallies and The Saddlers and ... >phew< ... The Wire Pullers and The Veggies and The Soupers and The Cow Heads and The Wessies and The Kimberlins and The Jam Eaters and The Pie Eaters and The Pork Eaters and The Goat Eaters and ... >goat eaters ?< ... >not even I believe that that one exists< ... um ... er ... last of all ? ... " The Un-chosen Ones " ...

ANY ONE AND ALL OF THE PEOPLE IN ENGLAND ARE " THE UN-CHOSEN ONES " IN THE EYES OF THOSE WHO CONTROL THE NON-POLITICAL SYSTEM CALLED " THE DIS-UNITED KINGDOM " ... THERE ARE LITERALLY TENS OF MILLIONS OF THEM - AND ANY ONE OF THEM COULD BE CHOSEN TO BE " THE ENGLISH NAPOLEON "

( OF COURSE I NO LONGER NEED TO WISH TO PLAY THE ROLE OF " THE WELSH NAPOLEON " BECAUSE I AM PLAYING THE ROLE OF A NON-EXISTING GOD/DESS )


Last edited by Repwblic on Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
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dai



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you have English footie fan friends they might be amused by my attempt at humour but I am now stuck =
http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?p=4666#4666

Of course even if all the football fans of England did unite to over throw The United Kingdom it would be pretty disastrous if they all blindly followed some kind of Napoleon : I suspect that he expertly manipulated The People in France in the same way that The Democrats in Westminster manipulated us through the illusion taught to us as " The United Kingdom " which is - note - neither a kingdom nor a democracy : constitutionally it is in fact a dictatorship but socio-economically it is an Aristocracy ... de facto it is just a political mess.

To stop them manipulating you - whoever you are, Pompyshite or Mush Scum - you need to improve your thinking skills ... and sack all of your managers ... pick new teams - and change the game : INSIST ON PLAYING POLITICS FOR YOUR COUNTRY - INSTEAD OF WITH IT !!!

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wEwGBIr_RIw
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heard a BBC Radio 4 discussion about this exhibition in The Bowes Museum about Napoleonia which excited my imagination : it was about how even though Bonaparte had been an enemy of The United Kingdom of greater magnitude than say Hitler he had many fans ... or at least once he was defeated he held a certain fascination for many for diverse reasons ... It was not just that like people wanted to possess a bit of Hitler's clothing, to sit in his chair or steal his battle-plans ... it was that Napoleon Bonaparte had overthrown the sorts of people who ruled those who wanted to emulate him : to overthrow a bunch of kings and queens and to appoint their family and friends instead and to declare themselves to be The Emperor in Europe and The World and The Cosmos - and to even be ... " dai."

ANYHOW ... BACK TO THE SUBJECT ... http://www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk/

( perhaps somebody could kindly go there and file a report on this for me ? )

http://www.thebowesmuseum.org.uk/Exhibitions/2017/The-Allure-of-Napoleon

The Allure of Napoleon - 28 January - 19 March 2017

[ THIS IS A VERY SHORT PIECE SO I CAN NOT REALLY DO JUSTICE TO IT ]

" The Museum’s collection contains an exceptional range of objects relating to Napoleon and the age he defined; all testifying to the allure of the man John Bowes dubbed “that old vagabond”. Through these objects we can trace the changing faces of Napoleon, and the restless search for fame. ... Napoleon became a popular Romantic hero, the myth and vigour of his achievements threatening to eclipse the memory of his rule. In 1840, his remains were repatriated to France and buried with solemnity at the military church of Les Invalides in Paris."

[ NOW THAT IS BIZARRE : THE NEXT PICTURE IS OF ROALD DAHL ... ]

http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/painting-of-napoleon-from-1815-at-barnard-castle-news-photo/528988498#painting-of-napoleon-from-1815-at-barnard-castle-picture-id528988498

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MniJsd1z4hE

http://www.aboutbritain.com/towns/barnard-castle.asp

" Barnard Castle is situated in County Durham in the north east of England, in a beautiful area known as Teesdale. The town grew up around the Norman castle of the same name, and is affectionately known to locals as "Barney". ... Barnard Castle lies south west of the City and county town of Durham, and west of Darlington, which is well known for its ground-breaking railway history. Barnard Castle is an appropriate starting point for visiting the Lake District. ... Just off Newgate is the Bowes Museum - a surprising building to find in Teesdale in County Durham. This museum was purpose built in the 19th century, inspired by a French chateau; the museum opened in 1892. It is one of the finest museums outside London. ... The Bowes Museum draws many people to Barnard Castle. It is home to an internationally renowned art collection and a huge range of treasures, which include furniture, clocks, porcelain, musical instruments, tapestries and toys. Probably the most famous of the treasures is the mechanical Silver Swan, which still delights the public by performing daily."
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.napoleonicsociety.com/english/tarttelin20.htm

NAPOLEON AT THE BOWES MUSEUM - By John Tarttelin, FINS

" ... what is really intriguing and of the utmost fascination to the Napoleonic scholar is an exhibition room that pits Napoleon against his most inveterate enemy of all time – the Comte d’Artois, the younger brother of Louis XVIII, whose motto could have been: ‘Divine Right by might’. D’Artois loathed Napoleon with a mindless passion because in his eyes the Corsican Ogre had stolen the throne of France from its ‘rightful’ owner. ... It was d’Artois, exiled from France by the Revolution, who concocted one assassination attempt after another on Napoleon’s life from Britain in comfortable boltholes first in Edinburgh and later at 72 South Audley Street London (from 1805 to 1814) – all the while supported by an large allowance from George III. He was literally ‘paid to plot’. 3 His creature Montholon eventually succeeded in poisoning Napoleon on the island of Saint Helena in the far-flung wilds of the southern Atlantic Ocean. His enmity pursued Napoleon across land and sea to his lonely grave. ...

... In Napoleon’s left hand he holds a sceptre while his sumptuous robe is covered in gold bees, a decoration used by the old kings of France. The symbolism is clear – Napoleon is their worthy successor. The Emperor’s right hand stretches over his famous Civil Code and around his neck is the grand collar of the Legion of Honour – an institution that recognized talent and ability in everyman. When Napoleon abdicated only twenty-six of these portraits had been completed and all were still in the artist’s studio, only to be finally distributed after the painter’s death. ... The royalist purges after Waterloo, backed by Lord Liverpool the British Prime Minister, and subsequent laws and prohibitions in France, along with Napoleon’s own death on Saint Helena in 1821, meant that the greatness of his Empire was already being consigned to history. Various royalist writers also re-wrote history to appeal to d’Artois and his ilk and it is from this time that the lies and mis information about Napoleon began to take root. The ‘official’ history stated that Napoleon had caused all the wars of the preceding two decades. This thought once planted by a very effective spin-machine has had the resilience of Japanese knotweed, hence the slurs and calumnies are still current to this day. ...

Very Happy

I will not take any more : this guy not merely admires but adulates Boney : a nice read.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.artfund.org/what-to-see/exhibitions/2017/01/28/the-allure-of-napoleon

ART FUND -

The Allure of Napoleon - The Bowes Museum : 28 January – 19 March 2017

The museum draws on its extensive archive of material pertaining to the Napoleonic era to consider the life and times of the French Emperor. ... Thanks to the fascination of its founders John and Joséphine Bowes in society under the political and military leader Napoleon, the Bowes Museum is rich with artefacts that tell of this particular period in French history. A fitting start to the institution’s 125th anniversary celebrations, this exhibition charts the rise and fall of the complex figure and his impact on Europe. ... Four thematic sections make up the display, from prints that present Napoleon as a political mover and shaker to portraits exploring connections between wider occupied Europe; paintings that tell of a changing high society in France and British military medals following the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. ...



... Displayed at the Paris Salon of 1814, Étienne-Jean Delécluze’s theatrical painting of the first Roman Emperor Augustus rebuking Cinna for his treacherous plans to kill him is one of the most outstanding pieces in the Bowes Museum’s permanent collection. It is presented as the centrepiece of the exhibition to highlight the uncertain loyalties preceding Napoleon’s devastating failure at Waterloo the following year.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


https://www.napoleon.org/wp-content/archives/newsletters/434.html

https://www.napoleon.org/en/

" Have a look at our selection of historical and cultural events across the world, for all ages and all Napoleonic tastes ! "

http://twickenhambeekeepers.apps-1and1.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Napoleonic-Pedestal.pdf

" A mahogany pedestal mounted with ormolui [ i.e. high-carat gold–mercury amalgam applied to a bronze object ] bees and N for Napoleon I Napoleon took the bee as an emblem as metal bees had been found in the
excavation of the tomb of Chilperic I,a 6th century Frankish king. The bees formed a symbolic link between Napoleon and the early rulers of France."

[ ON THE OTHER HAND - UNIVERSALLY - " THE HIVE " = " THE REPUBLIC " ]

http://www.teesdalemercury.co.uk/Articles/priceless-boots-are-restored-to-their-former-glory

TEESDALE MERCURY - Priceless boots are restored to their former glory

" NAPOLEON III’s last surviving pair of boots have been painstakingly restored and will go on display in Barnard Castle. ... The priceless boots once owned by the nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte had been in storage at The Bowes Museum for generations. ... The leather, which still bears Napoleon III’s sweat marks from his time in the saddle, was falling apart and the museum needed to do something to ensure their survival. ... Unfortunately the conservators were unable to save the boots themselves but they have managed to conserve the sweat marks for posterity - albeit that some self-appointed experts have expressed some doubts as to their authenticity ... but what I want to know is what happened to Napoleon II's boots ... ah - Napoleon II died in bed of a broken heart after his boots had been stolen by souvenir hunters ... honest ... would I lie to you ? ... Yes : in order to remind that plausibly presented preposterititions are often lies."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleon_II

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And whilst I was thinking about this 19c obsession with the Bonapartes I took a few minutes out here to go pay a visit to my obsession with Iolo ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Saint_David%27s_Day

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Saint_David%27s_Day#What_sources_
are_there_to_establish_the_date_of_St_David.27s_Day_i.e._what_evidence_
is_there_for_St_David.27s_Day_being_1st_March_before_1815_.3F

What sources are there to establish the date of St David's Day i.e. what evidence is there for St David's Day being 1st March before 1815 ?

I know that this looks like a " no-brainer " i.e. who would doubt that St David's Day has always been 1st March ... I could ...

... but I do so because in already knowing that Iolo Morgannwg & Co fathered a lot of other cunning cultural forgeries it seems to me to be entirely possible that in order to promote a national identity they would foster their political aspirations upon a suitable medieval Welsh saint and promote him to the role of the patron of the nation. After all this present St David's flag is dubious in its origins and its introduction has been extremely recent - thirty years or so ? - Twenty ? - A political invention.

The Red Dragon flag is the same sort of invention which apparently only dates from the middle of the 19c : its red dragon on a white over green field color order can be turned into a livery flag of red, white and green, just as the black german eagle with red talons on a golden field becomes a black, red, yellow triband. Thus Y Ddraig Goch may be a disguised version of the red, white, green tribands and tricolours used by republicans across Europe who identified themselves with the Bonapartes i.e. possibly Iolo Morgannwg.

What then is the political significance of 1st March that the republicans in Wales would seek to disguise it as St David's Day ... a day celebrating national identity ... a day which might be associated with a national struggle to break free from an empire ... the day on which Napoleon Bonaparte broke free from his imprisonment on Elba ...the day on which those who had been forced to submit to a monarchy enthroned by force broke free and freely gave their allegiance to each other in order to seek freedom ... ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hundred_Days

" ... On 26 February 1815, when the British and French guard ships were absent, he [ Napoleon ] slipped away from Portoferraio on board the French brig Inconstant with some 1,000 men and landed at Golfe-Juan between Cannes and Antibes on 1 March 1815. ... "

I think that the obvious question has to be asked : are there any sources prior to 1815 to prove St David's Day's date ?

DaiSaw (talk) 01:51, 26 January 2017 (UTC)

POST-SCRIPT : I WENT BACK THIS EVENING TO ADD IN SOME PROPER REFERENCES TO SUPPORT THAT ARGUMENT AND THAT CONTRIBUTION TO THE TALK PAGE OF THE SAINT DAVID'S DAY ARTICLE HAD BEEN DELETED ... THUS PROVIDING ME WITH AN EXCELLENT ILLUSTRATION OF WHAT THE DEMOCRATS IN WALES CALL " POLITICS " - NO DEBATE, JUST VANDALISM : WHICH HAS NO PLACE IN POLITICS ... THE " EDIT " WAS BY " DAI CAREGOS " = " DAI BOLLOCKS "

... The Catholic Christian Church seems to have made the Jewish King David ( father of Bathsheba etc ) into a saint and given him the 29th December as a feast day ... but some friends of mine this afternoon as we discussed this theory that so many things that are " Welsh " were 19c inventions to promote political ideas - in particular Republicanism ... um - yeah : some friends pointed out that there is a Saint " Davy " who sounds a lot like " Dewi " and whose feast day is 20th September ... actually I found several but the famous one is Blessed John Davy who was starved to death ... probably for refusing to sign The Electoral Register - or just for ducking out when Henry VIII was going around Tendering The Oath ... on 8th June 1537 ...
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Last edited by Repwblic on Fri Jan 27, 2017 2:33 am; edited 3 times in total
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2017 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Other historical figures have allure of course too ... tonight's proem ... [ email 26-01-17 ]

Dear XXXX,

I am not well educated and I am very slap dash : my " projects " amount to running notes.

I suggested to XXXX that he suggest to XXXX to write about this for you : he knows this period.

I was copying out poems about " ants " and " bees " which allude to " soldiers " and " workers."

My own poetry is the equivalent activity for others of doing crosswords, sodoku etc for others.

I try to bang them down in minutes - often whilst walking as a way to pass otherwise dead time.

Surely Sir William Shakespeare could never perform this trick -

Of writing rubbishy rhymes at night and then publishing them - quite quick -

For in his day the whole world for him was nothing but a stage :

Whilst in our play our whole world now is but something upon a page -

Which is being written by others ... Yet The Bard's Worlds of Words still stick ...

( About twenty minutes - not bad for 06.00am : trying to pass a sleepless night.)

Dai Saw [ my " bardic " tag of thirty five years ]

Regards,

David B Lawrence

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[ email received 22-01-17 ]

Dear XXXX

I should like to share some words of hope from Waldo Williams that I came across the other day and have been going round in my head ever since. The poem was published in May 1939 amid the clamour for war.

Daw dydd y bydd mawr y rhai bychain,
Daw dydd ni bydd mwy y rhai mawr,
Daw'r bore ni wêl ond brawdoliaeth
Yn casglu teuluoedd y llawr.

The day will come when the little ones shall be great,
The day will come when the mighty shall be no more,
The morning will come that will see only brotherhood
Drawing together the families of the earth.


This hope, we are told, "sustained the poet through the difficult years that were ahead". Now, when the threats to civilisation are in some ways even greater than they were then, it seems to me we need all the hope we can find.

XXXX


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldo_Williams

http://www.waldowilliams.com/?page_id=327&lang=en

https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2015/dec/07/poem-of-the-week-what-is-man-by-waldo-williams-translated-by-rowan-williams

What is Man ?

What is living? The broad hall found
between narrow walls ...

...

... What is it to govern kingdoms? A skill
still crawling on all fours.
And arming kingdoms? A knife placed
in a baby’s fist. ...

... What is love of country? Keeping house
among a cloud of witnesses ...

... What is the world to the wealthy and strong? A wheel,
turning and turning.
What is the world to earth’s little ones? A cradle,
rocking and rocking. ...

[ EXCERPTS FROM THE ABOVE TRANSLATION ]
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