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What's In A Name? or Put Not Thy Princes in Trust
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marianneh



Joined: 30 May 2013
Posts: 1935

PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2016 5:26 pm    Post subject: murray mints Reply with quote

Oddly enough, I have been reading about Margaret Murray within the last few days. Life is so serendipitous. It wasn't anything complimentary unfortunately.

I'll contribute to that thread soon. In the meantime, I've been deliberately not finding out anything about Theresa May, but I suppose we'll soon hear plenty.

I did note on 'Those Whose Children Lie Upon the Stones' filed inappropriately under press releases, that she had prevented the extradition of Gary McKinnon, a vulnerable adult to the US.

I felt obliged to acknowledge this while noting that it was not what we would have expected as she was apparently not keen on human rights culture. Some citizens must have been watching her career with avid interest, but most of us didn't see her coming up on the inside.

Take heart! Andrea Leadsom sounds like a total kook, and would you want King Boris? May hasn't been in the job five minutes. I don't expect great things, but maybe it won't be her fault if we go to hell in a handcart post Brexit.

There's something else to consider too. The tabloids have been saying, ''Who will be the next Mrs T?'' It's not very imaginative, but what else can they do? The scarcity of female prime ministers has given up a precedent famine.

Maybe she will be nothing like Thatcher. Margaret Thatcher enjoyed eleven years of absolute rule. As Dafydd said, by the end of it, she was expecting us to subsidize the boots with which she walked all over us by paying the poll tax.

A play that dissected the Salman Rushdie affair in early 1989 raised a laugh when Sheherezad alluded to 'an island in the west where two queens sat upon a single throne.'

But what are the chances that Theresa May will be on the throne for eleven years? We have yet to see if it will be eleven months. It could be that she will be a caretaker prime minister pending a general election in a very few months. Who's to say she will win it?

It is not exactly like the coronation of Gordon Brown after the resignation of Tony Blair. She did not exactly get the job by default. She was elected by her Conservative peers.

The handover does not have the level of fatuity we saw with Blair and Brown. But it's much too early to tell if she will stay the course, let alone metamorphose into Countess Dracula bathing in virgins' blood.
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marianneh



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2016 7:28 pm    Post subject: Knock at the door - St Francis Reply with quote

In 1979, I was a little kid in the first year in secondary school. It didn't seem strange that the teachers sometimes went on strike for an hour and refused to teach us. That was the world in which we lived.

The day that Margaret Thatcher came to power can't have been a school day for I was at home at midday. There was no 24 hour TV then. The three existing TV channels didn't warm up until midday.

Some of my younger friends were watching the twee children's TV show, 'Playschool' on BBC 2. The technicians made a not totally successful attempt to join BBC 1 for coverage of Margaret Thatcher outside Number 10.

The picture kept flitting between a mock up of the outside of the Playschool house and Thatcher at the door of number 10 quoting Francis of Assissi's 'Make me an instrument of your peace' speech, than which nothing could have been less appropriate. It had quite a ludicrous effect.

I was in the bathroom when I heard my adoptive mother saying gloomily, ''So we've got her for the next five years'', underestimating the enormity by six years. I rushed to watch the scene on TV.

We were a socially conservative family but we and all the neighbours supported Labour. I also religiously believed everything I read in the Daily Mirror. I felt quite sure this was the end of the world.

I also felt a quite unreasoning hatred of Thatcher considering she hadn't done anything yet. I had been brought up to have a conscience in good working order. If I absent mindedly walked out of a shop with a 6p comic, I would go back to pay for it.

Yet what I'd read in the paper had convinced me that it would be a meritorious act to assassinate Thatcher, considering what she would have in store for us. I didn't know the half of it.[/u]


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marianneh



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2016 7:51 pm    Post subject: kuna Reply with quote

At least before our marriage, my husband was not eligible to vote in UK elections. He was not a British, Irish or Commonwealth national, nor did he come from what was then an EU member state. Ha!

But he voted anyway. He filled out the form. No one questioned him on it. Perhaps it didn't occur to him that he was not entitled to do this in law.

It was not in his best interests to vote Conservative but for some time he did it. The Conservative agent who lived opposite gave him chocolate rabbits which were ostensibly for our son, then a tiny child. Well, why not? People have voted Brexit for worse reasons than being bribed with chocolate bunnies.

He surprised me before the 2008 presidential elections in the US. He deprecated Obama on the grounds that Kenyans and other SubSaharan Africans were not up to ruling a country, as could be seen from post colonial basket case countries in the region. I began to feel I didn't know him very well.

Instead he was rooting for Hillary Clinton. He thought it would be good to have a woman as the most powerful person in the world for a change. Our eldest son agreed.

I said, ''Of course it would be nice to have a woman for a change, but not just any woman! You have to take into account the policies and personality! Well, people voted for Margaret Thatcher in 1979 because they thought it was time a woman had a chance at last, and look what happened!''

My husband then came out with a paen of praise to Thatcher. He said with satisfaction that she had brought to an end the world where you could just leave school and go straight into a job or you could be sure of having a job for life.

A few days later I overheard two middle aged women on the bus having a dialogue that was a bit like a ballade. The recurring element was: ''Margaret Thatcher destroyed this country!''

At the time I thought their opinion of Thatcher was the opposite of my husband's. But I was wrong. He too thought that Margaret Thatcher destroyed this country. But he thought that was a good thing.
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Moritz



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2016 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Theresa may not last very long.
She looks like a zombie
She has come to eat our brains
After 40 years of Tory education Cuts and academies, she will starve to death.
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marianneh



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:00 am    Post subject: brain drain Reply with quote

She can eat my brain if she likes. I would hate to think of anyone starving to death.

And it would be no great sacrifice. Thinking brings far more suffering than joy in this world.Recently, I've heard friends I used to think were intelligent say,''I'm not racist! Some of my best friends are black BUT ...''. Then there was Dong on Auschwitz.

It'll be so restful, not having a brain. And it will help me to appreciate Talk Radio.
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marianneh



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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2016 1:45 pm    Post subject: ching-chang! Reply with quote

Dai has put up a post under our new thread, 'The Border That Runs Through Our Lives' in the Cultural File', to the effect that people don't know whether to condole or congratulate Hugh Grosvenor on the death of his father the Duke of Westminster. At the tender age of 25, Hugh has inherited everything. He owns more land in Britain than the queen.

My first reaction which is purely emotional is, ''What! He's the Duke of Westminster at that age! He must have been born in 1991! He can't remember the Soviet Union or the Thatcher years or testcard or Zebedee on 'The Magic Roundabout' or anything!

''It was only five minutes ago that his only thought was who should be his favourite Tellytubby! This is outrageous! He should be on a zero hour contract at MacDonalds!''

I hope nobody's going to tell us how much he earns an hour. He doesn't earn it but just rakes it in.

You might say that although he's done nothing to earn it, we would all welcome a windfall like this. Would anyone be crazy enough to renounce it? Wouldn't it be oppressive to forbid parents to leave everything to their kids?

But where does the freedom come in? The inheritance has strict and arbitrary strings attached.

Had he been an adopted or illegitimate son, he would not have been in line to inherit anything. His elder sisters Lady Tamara and Lady Edwina who are in their thirties, have been passed over of course.

It's not possible to feel emotional about this. They are all obscenely overprivileged. But it does seem pretty anachronistic in many ways.

Princess Diana's eldest sister Lady Sarah knew, as soon as she knew anything, that although she was the eldest Spencer child, the earldom would remain forever out of her reach.

We can see that she may have been attempting to fulfil her parents' ambitions by achieving an even more prestigious title by marriage. She would carp at her sisters on the need to be slim in order to achieve this.

She said ''Men don't like fat girls.'' Her younger brother Charles picked it up, and taunted girls on supposedly being fat.

Sarah had a romantic relationship with Hugh's father, and was hoping for a proposal. To be Duchess of Westminster would be much more respectable than Countess Spencer.

But they split up in a tempestuous way and this bounced Sarah into life threatening anorexia. She later briefly became Prince Charles' girlfriend although his first words to her were, ''Do you have anorexia?'', which lacked delicacy.

What are these aspirations worth? Sarah was pipped to the post as Princess of Wales by her younger sister, but it was the elder sister who sorted herself out after a stay in a residential clinic. Diana had bulimic symptoms and other mental health problems until her death.

Gerald Grosvenor, the now defunct Duke of Westmmisnter, was not a happy man. I'm sure the Daily Mail will have spreads on whatever kind of anguish it was that he had to endure. But at least he could wallow in his misery in comfort, even splendour.


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Moritz



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2016 1:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
''It was only five minutes ago that his only thought was who should be his favourite Tellytubby! This is outrageous! He should be on a zero hour contract at MacDonalds!''


You wishy washy liberal. Heads on pikes is the only language aristos and monoglots understand. In 40 months, there will be zero zero-hours-contracts because MacDonald's head will be on a pike too.

Whingeing at primogeniture misses the point. Suppose it were abolished and aristos were equal opportunity oppressors. Us Peasants would remain oppressed by 50% male aristos and 50% female aristos.
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marianneh



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2016 11:11 pm    Post subject: blob Reply with quote

You're so funny Dafydd. You want to see the Duke of Westminster's head on a pike, you don't think women should moan about salicistas, but over in another post, you stand up for Ann Nevill's right to be queen on the grounds that she was anointed with holy oils.

Scotland doesn't have entails in the male line. In Victorian times, the reigning Duchess of Sutherland used the local police force to throw the Gaelic speaking peasantry off her estates during the Highland clearances.

Did the exiles feel any better because they had been ethnically cleansed by a duchess instead of a duke? I don't suppose so.

In one of the Flashman novels, Flashman has an affair with a queen of Madagascar who is like a cross between Caligula and Hitler, putting her subjects in concentration camps and having palace purges for no obvious reason.


Flashman is jittery in case he becomes the next victim. He notices that her servant's manner to him is just the same as it was yesterday. Does this mean something sinister?

The queen's name was one of those really long Malgassy names. I can't remember it now. But I looked her up on Wiki, and she did exist, and was just as bad as she is in the novel.

I didn't totally agree with the argument about women priests when that was a hot topic, that they would have all the nurturing qualities we need in priests. Some women are nurturing. Some are not. This is a bit of a stereotype.

Over many centuries, the nearest women got to ecclesiastical office was by becoming nuns. And for some mysterious reason, nuns were often evil monsters, warped, sadistic, duplicitous.

If you believe in egalitarianism, you have to give a tepid welcome to women priests and lords while these roles continue to exist. But what we really need is a world where there are no priests and no obscene hereditary privilege.


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Moritz



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2016 11:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If you believe in egalitarianism, you have to give a tepid welcome to women priests and lords while these roles continue to exist. But what we really need is a world where there are no priests and no obscene hereditary privilege.
Very Happy Cool Laughing

The debate on Duke of Westminster was what the Law should be; the debate on Anna Nevilla was what the Law actually was.
If we debated what the Law should have been, then Harry Tudor would have been king immediately even though the actual Law was that Harry's reign started the nights before Bosworth car Park.
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dai



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What originally triggered my first first expressed Republican sentiments during in the 1969 Investiture was the way it warped people's minds : my general feelings on this remain the same which is that the tinsel tiaras and ridiculous riches are not the real threat but rather the delusions which are projected upon such persons ... " Aristo - crat " means " The Best - in Power " and the origins of it seem to me to lie in the kinds of teenage street gangs which develop into The Mafia etc : imagine two rival gangs asserting that they are the best - they rule this turf - they have the best roller skates ... by the time that it escalates into needing to have a souped up Ford Cortina in order to prove that they are " The Best " they are into extorting protection money from their local corner shops ... this to me is the origins of The United Kingdom's Aristocracy - and the origins of The Monarchy lie in the turf wars of Medieval England in which protection rackets such as these escalated from the petty knife fights of The Saxons ( check my Ancient Saxon here Moritz : their name derives from the long knife of the legend - the " Seaxe " - so " Y Saes " can be translated as " The Knives " ) [ * A VERY STRANGE BLUNDER - SEE BELOW ] into the full scale warfare which resulted in Bill The Bastard beating the crap out of everybody in 1066 and then taking a busman's holiday across South Wales ... The way in which anybody in Medieval Europe asserted their authority was by covering themselves in bling which was why there were sumptuary laws about who could own an Apple and what brand of gear they could wear on the battlefield ... whereas now footballers have weirder tonsures than the clergy in the Celtic Church and world championship boxers stride into the ring draped in ermine robes ... AND EVERYBODY GOES " OOOH - AAAAH - I WISH THAT I COULD HAVE ONE OF THOSE : I WANT TO INGRATIATE MYSELF TO BE CLOSE TO THIS PERSON ... LET ME JUST TOUCH THE HEM OF MARY QUANT'S GARMENT !!! "

Well you get the gist of my argument : I think that The Aristocracy in Medieval Europe is a limited idea of what I think is to do with a kind of psychological disorder in which such people are in pursuit of pretty sparkly things to dazzle others with - and robbing those others to get the means to obtain these things in order to get those others to say " Of course you ought to have these these things - here let me give you some more of my stuff - I am but a humble useless disgusting serf - whereas you are a noble creature." - At least that is what deference was about after centuries of those others learning that if they questioned why The Aristocrats got everything for doing nothing whilst the serfs did everything and got nothing - then those others found themselves suddenly unemployed in the sense that unemployment had for Medieval serfs and presently has for persons differently coloured in the southern United States : is it better to be dead than deferent ?

Relevant ? - http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p043lxs0/making-a-slave-1-trapped

I might inquire at this point Dafydd as to how your family lived in comparison to mine and Marianne's because you have never mentioned it : it seems to me that our families were deeply scarred by the 1930s and had a very ambivalent relationship to their various ways of escaping from poverty - " from each according to their ability and to each according to their need " seems to be our shared working rule, but my parents carried that further : everybody needs the means to live and thereafter no more - and those lucky enough to be healthy and clever should not use that to their private advantage but be proud to have the privilege to contribute more than those who are not e.g. teachers are already hugely privileged by the nature of their jobs so why should they also claim more to live on than roadsweepers or laundresses whose jobs are less satisfying etc and whose material needs are no less than any body elses ? Perhaps if doctors were paid less we might employ more to work fewer hours which would be good for them and beneficial for health provision since illnesses can not be scheduled as manufactured products can be planned for on a production line. ...

... The nexus here is money and my Dad in particular despised it as having no objective value and therefore useless a means to measure anybody's economic value : what do you think of such proposals as " Citizen's Income " given that if the production of goods becomes automated and ceases to employ people - and thus creates mass unemployment with The People dependent upon welfare and too poor to buy things - then this economy which is based upon earning and spending money must cease ? ... Personally I suspect that The Democrats will simply try to get rid of The People - except for those who are healthy enough to be kept alive until one of The Aristocrats whom they exist to serve needs an organ transplant ... the fact that The Welsh Government is now treating us all as their property ought to be very worrying.

[ * A VERY STRANGE BLUNDER : This post was written gone ( 01.00 ? 02.00 ? am ) and I was writing to pass the time because I was very tired but could not sleep after a day in which there was a stressful incident - in fact whilst I lay around fretting about it I got very little sleep at all - and one of the things which I may have been doing was playing with rhymes ... I will leave this mistake there as it is because it is weirdly suggestive - " saes " is the Welsh word for the medicinal plant " sage " ( Salvia officinalis ) - the healing herb - which makes a nice juxtaposition with the idea of wounding by " The Knives " which is a perfectly correct translation for " The Saxons " because it was their own names for themselves - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seax - " a type of sword or dagger typical of the Germanic peoples of the Migration period and the Early Middle Ages, especially the Saxons, whose name derives from the weapon " - their name in Welsh has variously been spelt Saesson, Sason, Seison, Saison, Saeson and increasingly Sacson in historical texts : the singular has been spelt as Seis, Sais and archaically Saes has also been recorded - but " saes " in modern Welsh is " sage " ... the phrase > " Y Saes " can be translated as " The Knives " < is therefore grammatically not correct - but " Y Saes " could mean the singular " The Knife " ... Daf's post below demonstrates how easily the eye just runs over the wrong spelling ... and it is probably worth noting that whilst Cymraeg in my life is mostly on the page - and I freeze when addressed in Welsh because I can not " language switch " - most people actually say something like " Sisnig " for " English." ]


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Moritz



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Moritz : their name derives from the long knife of the legend - the " Seaxe " - so " Y Saes " can be translated as " The Knives " )

That bit is indeed correct.

Then there was a big WALL OF TEXT. I cannot know if any of the rest of it is true.
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marianneh



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:57 am    Post subject: blobby Reply with quote

Behave yourself, Moritz. Margaret Beaufort was holding Ann Nevill's ermine train at her coronation. Maybe the bishop was throwing holy oils about in a careless manner, and a big blob landed on Margaret.

In the family that brought me up, great veneration was felt for royalty, and even an acquaintance who had worked in Buckingham Palace in a menial capacity was felt to have an aura of mystique. But they felt that other toffs, those who spoke with an extreme RP accent were there to be mildly ridiculed.

My adoptive father saw a programme in which an aristo called Rupert said that peasants and women should not be allowed to vote. He also said that Welshmen were bred to dig coal. My adoptive father became so incensed that he said it would be a good day's work to kill Rupert. We found out later that many viewers had felt the same. But I think my adoptive father was also uneasy about Rupert dressing up in drag which is not important.

My real father walked out of the room in disgust when the queen's coronation came on TV in 1953, but he also spoke dismissively of 'peasants.' My real mother and her sisters threw bread rolls at the TV when the Queen's speech came on TV on Christmas Day.

She had a bit of a weakness for watching royal weddings which she felt ashamed of, and a tendency to see Diana as a martyr. She got over it.

She now thinks the queen is up to no good, and was very critical of a friend of Roger who kept bragging that he had met the Duchess of Devonshire and sneered at plebs.
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dai



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2016 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am sorry that you do not like my style Daf - but I like to see your style juxtaposed with mine and Marianne's because it creates what I hope Y Repwblic ought to be about : everybody can write and argue from their own point of view with no orthodoxy ( besides the need to preserve the board from offending the rules of our host informe.com - because to sacrifice ten years of bullshit for something misinterpreted would be an unhappy thing ! )

Let me see what it is like to write little journalistic paragraphs like Marianne ... mmm ... In that wall of text that you complained about above I mumbled on about the Puritanical sort of values imparted to me which I sense have their roots in the Rhondda and the gist of it was that I was asking whether your parents imparted anything similar transplanted from Merthyr.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I would like to tell you a story Marianne - from my student days when I managed to get two rooms in a house in Llanbleddian Gardens for myself and my then close friend Mike : we were the two oddballs among the otherwise C&A clad students of architecture in UWIST i.e. everybody else seemed to be staidly uncritical of what was being taught to us which was a choice between copying examples of " Modernist " or " Traditional Welsh."

My spin on Hippy Architect was " Modernist " - a crisp black Manhattan with my long curly black locks cascading over my hardwearing waterproof Harris Tweed jacket which had useful pockets bulging with essential items like my propelling pencils, scientific calculator and travel alarm - whereas Mike's spin on Hippy Architect was " Traditional Welsh " - a really nice brand new blue-grey trilby which he battered into the kind of thing you see yokels of yore depicted in and long stringy straight tails of hair loosely draped over an old RAF jacket already battered for him and crammed full of such things as chewed up pencils, chalked string and a battered measuring tape ... make of this what you will, we were in full reaction to everything Punk until I met Boz ... and that is how we were when we arrived in Llanbleddian Gardens and there we were sat in the kitchen eating beans on toast with Red sauce ( Mike ) or HP Brown sauce ( Dave - as I was to him : it was two years later that I was dubbed " Dai Saw " by wee Jimmy and big Grant.)

[ HONEST DAF - I AM TRYING NOT TO BRICK THIS ]

( for our readers in China ) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cheltenham_Ladies'_College

Then The Three Girls from The Cheltenham Ladies' College arrived all together and stood staring at us from the doorway of the kitchen ... now to cut a very long story far too short they liked cooking - and the one thing that you can not do in a small kitchen shared by seven people is elaborate cooking e.g. I had cooked or rather opened a couple of tins and put them in a couple of saucepans and I had only just sat down and reached for the bottle of HP sauce when I found X stood over me arms crossed and foot tapping with a glare that would melt sunglasses demanding that not eat before I had washed these saucepans ready for her to use next ... as you can guess that took the best part of an hour and I ate my food cold.

Mike and I and the other two " boys" took to eating elsewhere and The Three Girls took to cooking elaborate meals for each other which already involved a lot more than porridge - and absolutely nothing which came out a bottle or tin unless it was labeled in a foreign language ( Welsh did not count ) - before they learned about the existence nearby of Lord Goldilocks who was the heir to an awful lot of gold locked up in Scotland ... I will not identify him but I can not help smiling at the slightly falsified memory of this : The Three Girls were determined to stir him up and get Goldilocks into one of their beds - perhaps all three of their beds ? - so they decided to make an end-of-term / early Christmas house dinner party and invite him ... and they lectured all of The Four Boys - myself and Mike especially sternly - on the correct social etiquette to be observed with The Aristocrat.

The Three Girls took it turns to woman the kitchen, the dining room and the first floor bay window and when the signal was given we rushed to our places in the narrow hall way to stand in a line and bow and curtsey as we were introduced to the almost Royal guest ... you think that I am making this up don't you ? - No : they really had us do this ... but ... The Three Girls had not really got a sense of humour and Mike and I really have a subtly subversive and very sly one : they had not required their troops to submit to an inspection beforehand because it never entered their heads that Mike and I did not own any suitable suits : being Hippy Architects we agreed to make a design statement - Mike chose stripes and I chose bands and The Three Girls banded together later to tear us off a stripe ... but our greatest crime against their occasion was for Mike to reach for The Red Sauce and me to reach for The HP Brown Sauce ...

... To be honest I now think that we should not have gone this far - but we thought that we were teasing them but not insulting their cooking ... but the hardest thing for them to bear was that Lord Goldilocks thought that we were amusing and he apparently enjoyed their discomfort : they had made him feel intensely uncomfortable with their unctuously obsequious deference and he enjoyed them being ... well one of them was bright red and very angry and her friend coldly laid into me afterwards for many of the things which later came to stand between us ... There are things that we do in adolescent self-righteousness which seem to be absolutely right and therefore as demonstrably justifiable as a mathematical equation because we have so little experience of how other people construe how the world works and how they have made their meanings out of their equally limited experiences ... I think now that I was as mistaken as they were ...

... I continue to have this contempt for such dangerous delusions as " Royalty " and " Aristocracy " but I suppose that I have developed a sympathy for those who enjoy them in a harmless way : my antipathy is for those who cultivate them for a vicious purpose ... I felt pity for Lord Goldilocks the second that he walked into that narrow hallway of our terraced house that night in December 1981 - his face was ashen and confused : he must have thought that we were all mocking him - and then shocked to find that this was being conducted very seriously by The Three Girls - and then perhaps confused as to what The Four Boys were up to ... But think of it this way : around the table that night was a mirror held up to The United Kingdom and what it reflected was the way that this non-political system warps the natural human disposition to be friendly and corrupts our everyday lives by constantly damaging our social relationships in Wales and The World.

I rather like this one ... incidentally The Three Girls were not snobs - they were sort of " playing house " and just expected The Four Boys to join in ... but Mike and I chose to play the part of the naughty boys ... I guess that we were too immature as yet to play any role in " Guys and Dolls " ...
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marianneh



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 12:24 pm    Post subject: a rapist in the White House Reply with quote

You might say that it is quite useful for spouses to share a surname in some contexts. It can be a helpful reminder of who is married to whom.

It doesn't work for me in the context of the US presidential farce. Whenever people speak about the Trump v Clinton contest, the visual image that pops into my mind is not of Hillary but of Bill Clinton, and that is not an image I want in my head.

As governor of Arkansas, Bill Clinton pandered to the worst instincts of the voters who could block his presidential ambitions. He would not commute the death penalty in the case of a young black man, who was so mentally disabled, that he wanted to put a piece of pizza from his last meal aside for later.

In a book which was scathing about both Clintons, Christopher Hitchens had a chapter with the intriguing title, ''Is There a Rapist in the White House?'. We found out in the 90s that Clinton was unable to keep his penis in his trousers for long.

Although the stories about Gennifer Flowers and Monica Lewinsky did contain a possible element of abuse of power, nobody has claimed that these bits of fun were not consensual. If it had not been for the semen stained dress, Clinton would not have 'fessed up, and we wouldn't even know if the stories were true.

But Hitchens had uncovered stories much grimmer than that. As governor of Arkansas, Clinton was said to have repeatedly forced himself on female constituents who had made appointments to see him about a variety of issues.

None of these claims have been established in a court of law. But, tellingly, without knowing about each other, they all reported that his MO involved subduing a victim by gripping her nose between his teeth.

He probably wouldn't have been the first rapist in the White House. An actress claimed to have been raped by Ronald Reagan in his thespian days.

Rape was not taken seriously in those days. Even she didn't take it seriously. It didn't stop her voting for him.

During the days of slavery, probably just about every president was a rapist. It was the fashionable way to make more slaves. But it would not have been recognised as an offence in law.

If Donald Trump gets to be president, we will see this fine old tradition continue. His remarks about grabbing women 'by the pussy' was a straight brag about serial sexual assault. It's impossible to read them any other way.

Now that women have come forward to verify his brags, he thinks he is the victim of a conspiracy by the media and Hillary! He has himself appeared with the women who made claims about Bill Clinton, some of whom he previously derided!

This is a dangerous game to play for a man who has much to hide. But you can't reason with someone who dismissed allegations by saying the complainant was too unattractive for him to grope.

In a sharper age, this would have destroyed him as when Oscar Wilde denied kissing a boy, adding that he was very ugly. As bad as these revelations are, we have reason to think Trump has much worse things in his past.

At least three women have made allegations of rape against him. One of them was Ivana Trump!

Apparently he started screaming at her that her plastic surgeon cum hairdresser had ruined his looks. He now had an artificial bald patch.

He then went up to her and brutally wrested handfuls of hair out of her own head. Then having manhandled her into a position where she could not defend herself, he suddenly exposed his penis and rammed it painfully inside her.

His attorney Michael Cohen has defended him, not on the grounds that the alleged assault didn't happen but that in law 'you can't rape a spouse.' He said this had been established in the courts over and over.

It is true that, except in Louisiana, US law is based ultimately on English Common Law. The learned judge Matthew Hale was very keen on hanging witches. Perhaps this indicates a negative attitude to women.

Hale opined that a woman could not bring a case for rape against her husband, because in entering marriage, she 'gives herself in that kind to her husband, which she cannot retract.'

This was not inserted in a statute nor was it a deliberation delivered in case law. It was a bit of musing found in his private writings a century after his death. Jurists were so impressed that they decided to treat it as an established legal principle.

So judges refused to hear cases against husbands up to 1991, when the case of R v R came to the conclusion that not only was the marital rape exemption not valid in English law but it never had been! It was based on a misunderstanding! That was not what the law books had said up to the previous day!

This legal frivolity about stuff which is traumatic from a worm's eye point of view can only raise a sardonic laugh. We'd heard of a husband attackting his estranged wife in the street and inflicting grave sexual assaults on her which did not involve vaginal penetration.

The judge threw the case out and said it should not have been brought. It all came, by inference, under the marital rape exemption.

So perhaps we should not be surprised by the impudent young puppy, Michael Cohen. To some of us it sounds like a terrible defence.

My client is not guilty of rape - not because he hasn't committed it - but because, through a legal loophole, he can't be prosecuted. It doesn't give us much confidence in the character of Donald Trump.

It was later pointed out that the marital rape exemption had been struck down in the state in question in 1984. Cohen has now apologised.

Since her divorce settlement contains a gagging clause, Ivana has recently said that when she accused the Donald of rape, she didn't mean it in a criminal or even a physical sense.She meant it in a metaphorical sense.

Her original description is not really open to that interpretation. It is a fair inference that Ivana now lacks the moral courage to tell the truth because she can see her millions disappearing.

An even worse allegation was initially thrown out on a technicality, probably under the Statute of Limitations.' But it is now going to be tested in court after all.

The complainant 'Jane Doe' claims that Donald Trump raped her when she was 13. According to the 'Girls Not Brides' campaign, girls of 13 in the Islamic world have died of internal injuries after first intercourse with their 'husbands.'

They were technically teenagers, but they were still too small and undeveloped for sex. Perhaps the Donald's bragging about the stupendous size of his penis is well founded.

I don't really think he should be ramming it into a 13 year old girl who might be small for her age, especially as she didn't want him to. She said that when she pleaded with him to desist, he hit her in the face, saying he could do whatever he wanted.

I can't say if this story is accurate. But, very unusually, a witness has come forward who is prepared to swear an affidavit that it did happen.

In the 1800s, people said that the allegations about Andrew Jackson were such that the question should not be whether he should be president but whether or not he should be hanged. And so it is with Trump.

He says that if he becomes president he will jail Hillary. It's the sort of threat you expect to hear from an aspiring dictator.

Perhaps the boot will be on the other foot. If the 'Jane Doe' case stands up in court, it is not a question of whether he should be denied the keys to the White House.

Not out of malice but just to protect the public, he should be locked up for the rest of his life.
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marianneh



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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 2:12 pm    Post subject: if... Reply with quote

If only Hillary had become preisident, I would have had a look back at her Welsh ancestors, and had a story about the 100 year old woman who had to be wheeled along to cast her vote. I would have said that when she was born, women had no right in law to vote in federal elections, but how she had lived to see the first woman president. But it was not to be.

Hillary has blamed her loss of the election on a campaign of vilification, fake news, misogyny, and perhaps just a little bit, on herself. It is unfortunately true that the rise of misogynistic abuse on the internet has put women off even considering political careers.


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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 2:26 pm    Post subject: the house of saxe coburg gotha Reply with quote

It is a hundred years this year since the House of Saxe Coburg Gotha became the house of Windsor to distance itself from its German roots. An American woman on the net commented that she had herself changed her surname when she married, but it was odd that a whole family should change its name.

I found this statement a bit weird.It's as if when a woman changes her name, it doesn't count, and she can't be a founder or an heir of a dynasty although she can be a bearer of children.

These days non marital children are likely to have their fathers' names, at least if their parents live together. So it appears even more true that a woman can't pass on a surname or be a carrier of the family flame.

More married women now keep their natal surnames. But, except in the case of Yvette Cooper, they don't transfer them to their children. This has an unfortunate distancing effect. Perhaps the children will be unhappy not to share a name with their mother.


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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 2:44 pm    Post subject: gonzalez Reply with quote

Miriam Gonzalez Durantez, a lawyer and the Spanish wife of Nick Clegg, was browned off to receive an invitation to speak at International Women's Day of all events, but the letter was addressed to Mrs Clegg, a title she has never used.

Up to the time of the Spanish Civil War at least, married women in Spain could be imprisoned for spousal rebellion. This might mean refusing to make her husband his favourite paella. It was not a dead letter. They really did go to prison for this sort of thing.

But at least they had the same names after marriage that they had had before. They would be addressed as Senora instead of Senorita, but there was no change of surname. Everyone in Spain has two surnames.

The first is a maternal surname which is carried on for only one generation. Some don't accept it as a 'real' surname. Picasso was unusual in favouring his maternal surname. It was more unusual and therefore more distinguished than his father's name.

Miriam wasn't just annoyed at the cultural insensitivity. She was a feminist. She had an ideological objection to receiving a letter addressed to Mrs Clegg.


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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 2:54 pm    Post subject: jeanne romee Reply with quote

When at her trial, Jeanne d'Arc was asked for her name, she gave an equivocal answer. She was sometimes known as Jeanne d'Arc but also answered to Jeanne Romee. The first 'e' in Romee has an acute accent which I can't reproduce here.

Her mother was called Isabelle Romee. In the area where they lived, girls were considered to have matrilineal surnames.
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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject: per jenette Reply with quote

Laura Perrins thinks that Miriam is being too sensitive, and that her 'aggressive feminism' does her no favours. Laura, who has a strong Irish accent and appears on Question Time, used to be a barrister.

After her children were born, she elected to be a full time mother. It is not really full time as she spends so much time campaigning on the subject, co-editing 'The Conservative Woman' and lecturing.

Laura is happy to use her husband's surname, and that is not even how she sees it. She now sees it as hers and her children's.

Laura has a right to call herself whatever she likes, but so has Miriam. Laura has slipped up recently by making some cack handed comment about Hitler and genocide.


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PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 3:42 pm    Post subject: joan Reply with quote

Joan Collins has been through five marriages but she always held on to her natal surname. She didn't want to lose her identity. She deprecated the ususal custom as it made a woman 'subservient.' She is cross with her daughter Tara who is a figure in the public eye aged 53, but now goes by Tara Arkle since her latest marriage.

I think it is making the change at a comparitively advanced age that seems so incongruous. I don't like Joan Collins and I deplore most of her attitudes. Although I do agree with her here, it's a bit paradoxical if she tries to push her daughter around and tell her what to do. Wouldn't that be treating her like a subservient person?

I heard teenage boys outside a supermarket trying to attract the attention of a young woman. Rather rudely, they addressed her by her surname. She called, ''Haven't you heard I'm married now? It's not Taylor now but Tyler.''

I felt a pang. I had attended the wedding myself. I knew she was going to do this and bit my lip. It was none of my business.

I read that 30% of married women now discard the usual custom. I'm surprised that the number is that high. I hope that it is a sign of things to come.Perhaps in a hundred years time, it will be obsolete.

Far from being an aggressive feminist, if I received letters addressed to 'Mrs [Husband's Name]', I didn't even mention to the person that that was not how I wanted to be addressed. I was so anxious not to put people in the wrong.

I formerly had a delusion that it is possible to avoid discord and mayhem by being inoffensive.But why am I even bothering to put up posts about a purely symbolic issue when the government is literally and physically if indirectly murdering disabled people? Is it a displacement exercise? Where are my priorities?
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