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Y Dydd Rhydd - 2017 Gorff 14 July - Bastille Day

 
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 2853

PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 11:01 pm    Post subject: Y Dydd Rhydd - 2017 Gorff 14 July - Bastille Day Reply with quote

From: David B Lawrence
Sent: 21 November 2016 23:05
To:
Subject: Fw: XXXX : would you be kind enough to answer her questions about Dr William Price ?

Dear XXXX,

I have written to ZZZZ ZZZZ on your behalf as below : please wait until he replies to me - or writes to you directly.

I really enjoyed the lecture - thank you very much for remembering my interest in Dr William Price and his Neo-Druidism.

I know that you do not agree with my advocacy of " Pure Republicanism " but you are interested in the history of religion.

You know that Dafydd improvised a " Civil Religion " ceremony for " Y Dydd Rydd " on 14th July 2016 ( which was lovely.)

This is how we developed " Y Dydd Rydd " - " The Free Day " - over the past five years to be like the original 1790 event ...

... The People in Wales think that " Bastille Day " is about the siege - but it was a picnic to celebrate restoring the peace !

http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?t=442

http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?t=511

http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?t=636

http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?t=1088

http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?t=1197

http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?t=1308

We have shifted the location to Caerphilly for a variety of reasons but the most prominent one is " The Priest of Nature " -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Williams_(philosopher)

- so if the following idea does not interest you or your friends you might introduce them to an 18c religious experimenter.

I am really a fan of this 18c " Civil Religion " stuff : it may seem to be naff to others but I think that modern demos are dull.

I think that what Starhawk introduced into political demonstrations in The USA made The Public Discourse more positive.

I would like to see a more positive, creative, imaginative and above all pleasant culture of political protest here in Wales.

I want The Protesters in Wales to anticipate that demonstrations will be enjoyable not miserable and so motivated to go.

" Y Dydd Rhydd " is as billed : a day off ... no politicking ... but an opportunity to meet for an hour or so for a conversation.

On the other hand at the end we stand by the David Williams Memorial and torture " The International " to mark the day.

Near the memorial is a Neo-Druidic circle of stones around the " altar " where Dafydd unsheathed / sheathed " The Pen."

You know several of The People in Neo-Paganism : would they be interested in re-creating a 19c Neo-Druidic ceremony ?

For " Y Dydd Rhydd " 2016 - say about half an hour around 8pm on the evening of Friday 14th July ? In the pub if it rains ?

I thought it worth floating the idea to those who would not do what we do : improvise it all and forget the sandwiches ...

I am going to post about next year's here -

Y Dydd Rhydd - 2017 Gorff 14 July - Bastille Day = http://repwblic.informe.com/viewtopic.php?p=4419#4419

Love and Peace !

David B. Lawrence


From: David B Lawrence
Sent: 21 November 2016 21:21
To:
Subject: XXXX : would you be kind enough to answer her questions about Dr William Price ?

Dear ZZZZ ZZZZ,

you may remember me opining that Dr William Price was practicing Rousseauan " Civil Religion."

A friend of mine XXXX - WWWW WWWW WWWW - produced some artifacts associated with Dr William Price and WWWW WWWW WWWW - I just had to comment upon that matter in order to make clear what Neo-Druidism was about.

My friend - WWWW WWWW WWWW - has just asked me a question which I have answered WWWW WWWW WWWW Dr William Price ...

I have just asked her in a text as to whether she would like me to ask you to ask her questions by writing to you ( because as ever I am a scatter-brain and busking it.) I may not get a reply for a day or so because she lives in a mobile phone signal blind spot in MMMM.

Because she and I are old friends and you WWWW WWWW WWWW -

http://www.WWWW WWWW WWWW [ THIS IS GETTING TO BE A BIT DIP ]


... I looked for WWWW WWWW WWWW

You may well find her to be very interesting and I know that I can not WWWW WWWW WWWW.

Regards,

David B Lawrence

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_religion

Civil religion is a concept that originated in French political thought and became a major topic for American sociologists since its use by Robert Bellah in the 1960s. It means the implicit religious values of a nation, as expressed through public rituals, symbols ( such as the national flag ) and ceremonies on sacred days and at sacred places ( such as monuments, battlefields or national cemeteries.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_religion

The theory of political religion concerns governmental ideologies whose cultural and political backing is so strong that they are said to attain power equivalent to those of a state religion, with which they often exhibit significant similarities in both theory and practice. In addition to basic forms of politics, like parliament and elections, it also holds an aspect of sacralization related to the institutions contained within the regime and also provides the inner measures traditionally considered to be religious territory, such as ethics, values, symbols, myths, rituals and for example a national liturgical calendar. ... The term is sometimes treated as synonymous with civil religion, but although some scholars use the terms equivalently, others see a useful distinction, using "civil religion" as something weaker, which functions more as a socially unifying and essentially conservative force, whereas a political religion is radically transformational, even apocalyptic.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_religion

A state religion ( also called an established religion, state church, established church, or official religion ) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. A state with an official religion, while not secular, is not necessarily a theocracy – a country whose rulers have in their hands both secular and spiritual authority. ... Official religions have been known throughout human history in almost all types of cultures. They were adopted by most ancient states, both monoethnic and polyethnic, and observing them was a requirement made to all citizens, and especially public officials. ... Official religions justified and reinforced the type of government existing in a society. Sanctifying it as the most, or the only, correct ( divine ) one, they often put forward and/or supported ideas of its expansion to other lands, whether the latter already follow the same religion or, sometimes not.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Social_Contract

http://www.constitution.org/jjr/socon_04.htm - see section 8 :

The dogmas of civil religion ought to be few, simple, and exactly worded, without explanation or commentary.
The existence of a mighty, intelligent and beneficent Divinity, possessed of foresight and providence, the life to come, the happiness of the just, the punishment of the wicked, the sanctity of the social contract and the laws: these are its positive dogmas. Its negative dogmas I confine to one, intolerance, which is a part of the cults we have rejected. ... Now that there is and can be no longer an exclusive national religion, tolerance should be given to all religions [ = " IDEOLOGIES " AS WE NOW DEFINE ANY BELIEF SYSTEM IN THE POST-MODERN REPUBLICANISMS ] that tolerate others, so long as their dogmas [ = " IDEOLOGICAL CONVICTIONS " E.G. RACISM, SEXISM, ISLAMA-PHOBIA ETC. ] contain nothing contrary to the duties of citizenship. But whoever dares to say: Outside the Church is no salvation, ought to be driven from the State, unless the State is the Church, and the prince the pontiff. Such a dogma is good only in a theocratic government; in any other, it is fatal. ... [ THE REPUBLICANS IN WALES ARE TREATED AS HERETICS AND EXCLUDED FROM THE POLITY ]

[ Neo-Druidry was originally constructed in full opposition to The State Religion and convening the Gorsedd was more or less regarded as being a criminal act because in the 1790s it was obvious to The Supporters of The United Kingdom that it refers to The Social Contract ( Book Four - Section Eight ) and was therefore subversive of The Established Church i.e. The Anglican Church which was in this period was suffering a crisis due to the reformers within it - The Methodists - having started to leave en-masse out of contempt for The Aristocracy which controlled The State using this supposedly charitable branch of The United Kingdom as a means to coerce The People in Poverty and to explain why The Slave Trade should continue and to argue that Christianity is really exactly the opposite of what Jesus taught etc. ... The 18c Methodists on becoming " Non-Conformists " later became closely associated with modest pleading in the 19c for Democracy and Reform - whereas other religious groups already steeped in " Dissent " since the 17c were suspected of Republicanism - and some newly founded religious groups like The Unitarians and The Universalists actually were Republicans but in the 1790s they were still not Anti-Monarchist i.e. their concern was to establish " The Rule of Law " and they usually made a big point of putting " God Save The King ! " when they raised " Y Faner Wen " e.g. in " The Merthyr Riots " of 1831 the protesters were gathered like a flock of lambs to the slaughter beneath that slogan when the English soldiers opened fire and bayoneted them " In The Name of The King." The 18c Republicans objected to Democrats and contended against The State in The Courts - which is where they succeeded in making Slavery illegal.]
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dai



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2017 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Y Dydd Rhydd - 2017 Gorff 14 July - well it shares the date with La Fete Nationale ( " Bastille Day " ) but not much else : I can not so far bring any imagination to this although I liked Dafydd's innovation last year with the sheathing and unsheathing of The Pen in Wales to the recitation of The Old Ancient Neo-Druidic Question - " A Oes Heddiw ? " ... I WANTED DAF TO PLAN THE WHOLE THING THIS YEAR ...

... As it happens ... well - whatever happens : I am going to do nothing more - so far as I have planned it yet - than to turn up at The David Williams Memorial ( in the park near to the Gorsedd Circle - facing out over the castle's lake ) ... mumble Yr Rhwngwladol and ... go and have a pint in The Court House pub ... may be just a half there and another in Y Groes Wen ... I think that 8pm is a good time to mumble.
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dai



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2017 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps we should get a cheap ticket to London for this year's Bastille Day ?

http://london.eventful.com/events/bastille-day-summer-social-/E0-001-103203043-5

https://www.timeout.com/london/things-to-do/bastille-celebrations

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bastille-day-2017-tickets-35507789755

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.evensi.uk/amp/bastille-day-2017-qp-ldn/215451206

http://www.londongrill.com/bastilleday/

https://www.skiddle.com/whats-on/London/Hootananny-Brixton/Bastille-Day-La-Morte-Subite/12993640/

http://www.visitbankside.com/whats-on/shopping-bankside

http://www.frenchtuesdays.com/?vip=f4251a1ca05ed8b73f3df4fc44453884

http://hcmm.org.uk/13th-london-maritime-charity-ball-14th-july-2017/

http://www.belushis.com/blog/london/urbanfest-2017-london

http://www.shacklewellarms.com/listings/events/15-jul-17-technologic-french-special-bastille-day-party-the-shacklewell-arms/

There were lots of hits for Bastille Day events from past years - this was interesting :

http://londonist.com/2013/07/bastille

______________________________________

http://bastilleweek.com

https://www.bastilledaymelbourne.com

Fewer than I expected but in France it is not " Bastille Day."

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=47j5WfkhPyY

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6_x15KzGPyM

________________________________________

Cymraeg - " Y Dydd Rhydd " = " Le Jour Férié " - Francais = The Free Day

[ i.e. make The Day Free from politicking and socialise and avoid demonstrations and pretentious speeches : the original Fete Nationale was just.a very grand picnic to celebrate not The ( bloody violent ) Fall of The Bastille but The ( successfully revolutionary ) Year of Peace which had followed and had resulted in The Absolute Monarchy of The Ancieme Regime accepting a Constitution with some Democratic elements in it - albeit that no women and only a few men had any votes.]

https://fr.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jour_férié

A holiday : a civil or religious feast - especially commemorating an event - not compulsory and unpaid : peculiar to each country and if shared often celebrated according to local traditions etc


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps Helen Maria Williams would be a good subject to write about for Y Dydd Rhydd 2017 ?



https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/helen-maria-williams

Helen Maria Williams was a British poet, novelist, essayist, and translator known for her support of radical causes, such as abolitionism and the French Revolution. Born in London, Williams was educated by her mother and began publishing her poetry and essays with the help of her mentor, Dr. Andrew Kippis. Ardently political, one of Williams’s first works, An Ode on the Peace, celebrated the end of the American Revolution.

In 1784, under Kippis’s guidance, Williams wrote Peru, a long poem in six cantos, which detailed the results of Spanish colonialism on the indigenous people of South America. Her next collection, Poems, published in 1786, demonstrated her abilities as a social critic and an advocate of feminine sensibility; its poems vehemently opposed war, slavery, religion, and Spanish colonial practices. Williams’s novel supporting the French Revolution, Julia, was published in 1790.

Once Williams had allied herself with the Girondists, she moved to Paris and primarily wrote letters and prose. She also hosted salons, entertaining such philosophers as Mary Wollstonecraft, Francisco de Miranda, and Thomas Paine. Thrown into a Luxembourg prison for her political beliefs, Williams was allowed to write sonnets and work on a series of English translations of French literature, most notably Jacques-Henri Bernardin de Saint-Pierre’s novel Paul et Virginie.

Williams was eventually released from prison and fled to Switzerland for a short period before returning to Paris. She continued to write until Napoleon arrested her in 1802 for her poem Ode on the Peace of Amiens. Troubled by Napoleon’s imperial ambitions, Williams stopped writing for a period of time. She resumed her literary career in 1815, however, and wrote poems, letters, sketches, some short fiction, and translations until her death.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Maria_Williams

Helen Maria Williams (17 June 1759 – 15 December 1827) was a British novelist, poet, and translator of French-language works. A religious dissenter, she was a supporter of abolitionism and of the ideals of the French Revolution; she was imprisoned in Paris during the Reign of Terror, but nonetheless spent much of the rest of her life in France.

A controversial figure in her own time, the young Williams was favourably portrayed in a 1787 poem by William Wordsworth, but (especially at the height of the French Revolution) she was portrayed by other writers as irresponsibly politically radical and even as sexually wanton.

She was born on 17 June 1759 in London to a Scottish mother, Helen Hay, and a Welsh army officer father, Charles Williams. Her father died when she was eight; the remnant of the family moved to Berwick-upon-Tweed, where she had what she herself would describe in the preface to a 1786 book of poems as "a confined education".[3] In 1781 she moved to London and met Andrew Kippis, who would have great influence on her literary career and political views and brought her into contact with the leading London intellectuals of her time.

Her 1786 Poems touch on topics ranging from religion to a critique of Spanish colonial practices. She allied herself with the cult of feminine sensibility, deploying it politically in opposition to war ("Ode on the Peace", a 1786 poem about Peru) and slavery (the abolitionist "Poem on the Bill Lately Passed for Regulating the Slave Trade", 1788).

In the context of the Revolution Controversy, she came down on the side of the revolutionaries in her 1790 novel Julia and defied convention by travelling alone to revolutionary France, where she was hosted by Mme. Du Fossé, who had earlier, in London, given her lessons in French. Her letters from France marked a turn from being primarily a writer of poetry to one of prose. She enthusiastically attended the Fête de la Fédération on the anniversary of the storming of the Bastille and returning briefly to London in 1791 was a staunch, though not completely uncritical, defender of the Revolution. Returning to France in July 1791, she published a poem "A Farewell for two Years to England"; in fact she briefly visited England again in 1792, but only to persuade her mother and her sisters, Cecilia and Persis, to join her in France just as the country was moving toward the more violent phases of its revolution.

After the September Massacres of 1792, she allied herself with the Girondists; as a saloniere, she also hosted Mary Wollstonecraft, Francisco de Miranda and Thomas Paine. After the violent downfall of the Gironde and the rise of the Reign of Terror, she and her family were thrown into the Luxembourg prison where she was allowed to continue working on translations of French-language works into English, including what would prove to be a popular translation of Bernardin St. Pierre's novel Paul et Virginie, to which she appended her own prison sonnets. Upon her release, she travelled with John Hurford Stone to Switzerland. She was harshly criticised for this since Stone, separated from an unfaithful wife, was still legally a married man; the subsequent history of Williams and Stone's relationship only tended to confirm the rumours. Nonetheless, her few poems from this period continue to express Dissenting piety and were published in volumes with those of other religiously like-minded poets. In 1798, she published A Tour in Switzerland, which included an account of her travels, political commentary, and the poem "A Hymn Written Amongst the Alps".

Williams' 1801 Sketches of the State of Manners and Opinions in the French Republic showed a continued attachment to the original ideals of the French Revolution but a growing disenchantment with the rise of Napoleon; as emperor, he would declare her ode "The Peace signed between the French and the English" (also known as the "Ode on the Peace of Amiens") to be treasonable to France. Nonetheless, he proved to be, in this respect, more lenient than the revolutionary government had been to this now-famous international literary figure: she spent a single day in prison and continued to live and write in Paris. After the Bourbon Restoration, she became a naturalised French citizen in 1818; nonetheless, in 1819 she moved to Amsterdam to live with a nephew she had helped raise. However, she was unhappy in Amsterdam and soon returned to Paris, where, until her death in 1827, she continued to be an important interpreter of French intellectual currents for the English-speaking world.



http://enlightenment-revolution.org/index.php/Williams%2C_Helen_Maria

Williams, Helen Maria

Helen Maria Williams (1761-1827): English woman of letters.

London-born Helen Maria Williams was one of three daughters of a Welsh father and Scottish mother. After the death of the father when Williams was only eight years old, the Williams family took up residence in Berwick-on-Tweed, near the Scottish border, where the mother continued the education of the daughters. Williams returned to London at the age of 18, accompanied by the Rational Dissenter Dr. Andrew Kippis, editor of the Biographia Brittanica. Dr. Kippis facilitated the publication of Williams’ first poem "Edwin and Eltruda" in 1783. Owing to the success of the poem, the Williams family was able to reunite in London, where they met with many of the prominent intellectuals of the period, including Frances Burney, Anna Seward, and possibly Franklin, Benjamin.

Williams continued to publish poems throughout the 1780s, most notably "An Ode to the Peace" (1783) which celebrates the end of the war for American independence, and "Peru" (1786) which details the disastrous effects of the Spanish conquest on the indigenous people of South America. In 1788 Williams published "A Poem on the Bill Lately Passed for Regulating the Slave Trade" (also known simply as "The Slave Trade"), which furthers her representation of the domestic lives of individuals victimized by political and commercial policies.

Throughout 1789 Williams befriended Monique Coquerel, a French woman exiled to London—the young wife of Augustin du Fossé, son of the Baron du Fossé who disapproved of Coquerel’s humble birth. Following the Baron’s death, his young son refused his title and thus embraced the basic tenets of the French Revolution. As an act of friendship, du Fossé invited Williams to France for the summer of 1790. Williams wrote copious letters describing her observations. These letters were later made public under the title of Letters Written in France in the Summer of 1790. This manuscript was but the first of eight volumes of letters devoted to Williams' observations of the events in France during and following the Revolution. The letters—Williams most popular work—are now known simply as Letters from France. For Williams, the persecution of the Fossés stood for the abuses associated with the ancien régime, and the Fossé’s ability to live in peace under the post-Revolutionary government demonstrated the freedoms associated with the Revolution.

In 1790 Williams produced her only novel, Julia, a reworking of Rousseau, Jean-Jacques's Julie; ou, la nouvelle Héloise. The novel contains the first of Williams' writings on the French Revolution, the poem “The Bastille, A Vision,” in which she praises the ideals of the new regime. Julia exists today as one of the earliest depictions of a woman divided by the notions of sense and sensibility, doing so in a style lauded by The Critical Review as “tender, pathetic, and pleasing.”

In 1792 Williams moved to France, never to return to England. In 1793 during the English seizure of the French fleet at Toulon, Williams was imprisoned by Robespierre, Maximilien François Marie Isidore de along with other non-native French. She escaped the guillotine only thanks to her sister’s Swiss fiancé, Althanese Coquerel. After a six-month stay in Switzerland to avoid the threat of Robespierre, Williams returned to Paris where she produced A Tour of Switzerland in 1798 along with more letters, sketches, short fiction, and translations, most notably a translation of Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Jacques Henri’s Paul et Virginie.

Williams’ experiences in the private sphere were similar to those of the public. In the early 1790’s Williams became involved with the married John Hurford Stone, and although Stone divorced in 1794, critics still do not know whether or not Williams and Stone ever married. Their long-standing relationship caused a scandal in England and resulted in many personal attacks against Williams in the British press. These attacks, although directed toward Williams’ personal life, damaged her public life as an author as well.

Williams died in France on December 14, 1827. She is buried in Père Lachaise cemetery next to Stone.
Williams is best known for the several volumes of letters and sketches that provide an eyewitness account of the French Revolution, the Age of Bonaparte, and the Restoration of the French monarchy. An early supporter of the Revolution, Williams’ enthusiasm waned during the bloody violence associated with the Reign of Terror. Her initial admiration for Bonaparte, Napoleon gave way to disillusionment, and by the time the Bourbon monarchy was restored on a constitutional basis in 1818, she viewed the event in positive terms. Williams' accounts of the events she witnessed were strongly influenced by the culture of sensibility, and she is both praised and disparaged for feminizing the French Revolution and its aftermath for her readers.

Further Reading:
Blakemore, Steven, 'Helen Maria Williams and the French Revolution', in Blakemore, Crisis in Representation (1997), 153-198.

Kennedy, Deborah, Helen Maria Williams and the Age of Revolution, 2002.

Article by - Cathy Jellenik, The Citadel [ MY APOLOGIES IF I HAVE BEEN INSOLENT : THIS ARTICLE COULD NOT BE TRIMMED BECAUSE IT WAS SUCH A COHERENT WHOLE ]

https://www.hendrix.edu/academicaffairs/profile.aspx?id=70748

Cathy Jellenik, Ph.D. Associate Professor of French, Hendrix College ( Arkansaw ? )

Dr. Cathy Jellenik leads Arkansas chapter of " Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America "


Last edited by dai on Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:42 pm; edited 4 times in total
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09699080903533296?src=recsys

FROM LIBERTY TO LECHERY: PERFORMANCE, REPUTATION AND THE “MARVELLOUS STORY” OF HELEN MARIA WILLIAMS

Louise Duckling

Journal Women's Writing
Volume 17, 2010 - Issue 1: Women Out Loud

Pages 74-92 | Published online: 08 Apr 2010
Download citation
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09699080903533296

Abstract

Helen Maria Williams gained celebrity status in the 1780s as a heroine of sensibility. She was also a clever polemicist and succeeded in establishing her own brand of political philosophy, exploiting commercial techniques and basing her arguments upon values traditionally considered as “female”. This article explores Williams's rhetorical strategies in her writing, with a particular focus on her Letters Written in France (1790). Williams foregrounds her own authorial performance in this popular text and is concerned throughout with the concept of theatricality. She even casts herself in the role of Liberty—yet by 1798 she was being satirically typecast as Lechery by hostile critics. This article considers Williams's fall from grace and how her public image as a literary darling is transformed into a stereotype of the “petticoat politician”: licentious, intemperate and wild.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01440359508586567?src=recsys

Public loathing, private thoughts: Historical representation in Helen Maria Williams’ letters from France

Jack Fruchtman Jr.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01440358908586357?src=recsys

Helen Maria Williams and radical sensibility

Chris Jones

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01440359208586475?src=recsys

Helen Maria Williams's letters from France: A national romance

Angela Keane
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Williams%2C%20Helen%20Maria%2C%201762-1827

The Online Books Page

Online Books by

Helen Maria Williams

(Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827)

Online books about this author are available, as is a Wikipedia article.

[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Julia: A Novel, Interspersed With Some Poetical Pieces (2 volumes; London: Printed for T. Cadell, 1790) (HTML at Michigan)
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters Containing a Sketch of the Politics of France, From the Thirty-First of May 1793, Till the Twenty-Eighth of July 1794; and of the Scenes Which Have Passed in the Prisons of Paris (4 volumes; London: Printed for G. G. and J. Robinson, 1795-1796)
Volume I: multiple formats at Google
Volume II: multiple formats at Google
Volume III (published as "Letters, Containing a Sketch of the Scenes Which Pass in Various Departments of France During the Tyranny of Robespierre"): multiple formats at Google
Volume IV (may be mislabeled as Volume 2): multiple formats at Google
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters Written in France, in the Summer 1790, to a Friend in England: Containing Various Anecdotes Relative to the French Revolution, and Memoirs of Mons. and Madame du F. (4th edition; London: Printed for T. Cadell, 1794) (multiple formats at Google)
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A Narrative of the Events Which Have Taken Place in France, From the Landing of Napoleon Bonaparte on the First of March, 1815, Till the Restoration of Louis XVIII (1st edition; London: J. Murray, 1815) (multiple formats at archive.org)
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: An Ode on the Peace (London: Printed for T. Cadell, 1783) (multiple formats at archive.org)
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, trans.: Paul and Virginia (New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1851), by Bernardin de Saint-Pierre (Gutenberg text)
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, contrib.: Poems, Moral, Elegant and Pathetic (London: Printed for E. Newbery, 1801), also contrib. by Alexander Pope, Mr. Jerningham, Robert Blair, Thomas Gray, and Thomas Percy (multiple formats at archive.org)
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Poems on Various Subjects (HTML at UC Davis)
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, ed.: The Political and Confidential Correspondence of Lewis XVI, With Observations on Each Letter (3 volumes; New York: Printed for H. Caritat, 1803), by François Babié de Bercenay and Sulpice Imbert La Platière
Volume I: multiple formats at archive.org
Volume II: multiple formats at archive.org
Volume III: multiple formats at archive.org
[Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A Tour in Switzerland: or, A View of the Present State of the Governments and Manners of Those Cantons, With Comparative Sketches of the Present State of Paris (2 volumes; London: Printed for G. G. and J, Robinson, 1798)
Volume I: page images at Google
Volume II: page images at Google
Help with reading books -- Report a bad link -- Suggest a new listing

Additional books from the extended shelves:

[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: The charter, (Paris, 1819) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Correspondance politique et confidentielle inédite de Louis XVI, avec ses frères, et plusieurs personnes célèbres, pendant les dernières années de son règne, et jusqu'a sa mort; (Paris, Debray, an XI, 1803), also by King of France Louis XVI (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Correspondance politique et confidentielle inédite, de Louis XVI, avec ses frères et plusieurs personnes célebres, pendant les dernières années de son règne, et jusqu'à sa mort; (À Londres, À la Librairie française, 1803), also by François Babié de Bercenay and Sulpice Imbert La Platière (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, ed.: Correspondance politique et confidentielle inédite de Louis XVI : avec ses frères et plusieurs personnes célèbres, pendant les dernières années de son règne, et jusqu'à sa mort ; avec des observations par Hélene-Maria Williams ... (Paris : Debray, 1803), by François Babié de Bercenay and Sulpice Imbert La Platière (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Edwin and Eltruda. A legendary tale. (London, Printed for T. Cadell, 1782), also by Andrew Kippis (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Edwin and Eltruda: A legendary tale. By a young lady. (London : printed for T. Cadell, 1782) (HTML at ECCO TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A farewell, for two years to England; a poem ... (London, Printed for T. Cadell, 1791) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Four new letters of Mary Wollstonecraft and Helen M. Williams / (Berkeley : University of California Press, 1937), also by Mary Wollstonecraft, Carrie Cobb Autrey, and Benjamin Putnam Kurtz (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: I revolutionens Frankrike, åren 1792-1795 : brev från en engelsk dam till hennes bror i England / (Stockholm : Wahlström & Widstrand, [1920]), also by Simon Brandell and Hippolyte Taine (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Julia, a novel; interspersed with some poetical pieces. By Helen Maria Williams. In two volumes.: (London : printed for T. Cadell, 1790) (HTML at ECCO TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Julia, a novel; interspersed with some poetical pieces. By Helen Maria Williams. In two volumes.: (London : printed for T. Cadell, 1790) (HTML at ECCO TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters containing a sketch of the politics of France (London : printed for G. G. and J. Robinson, 1795) (HTML at ECCO TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters containing a sketch of the politics of France (Philadelphia: : Printed for Mathew Carey, William Young, Thomas Dobson, H.& P. Rice, and John Ormrod., M,DCC,XCVI. [1796]) (HTML at Evans TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters containing a sketch of the politics of France : from the thirty-first of May 1793, till the twenty-eighth of July 1794 : and of the scenes which have passed in the prisons of Paris / (London : Printed for G. G. and J. Robinson ..., 1795-96), also by London G. G. and J. Robinson (Paternoster Row (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters containing a sketch of the politics of France: from the thirty-first of May 1793, till the twenty-eighth of July 1794, and of the scenes which have passed in the prisons of Paris. By Helen Maria Williams. ... (London : printed for G. G. and J. Robinson, 1795) (HTML at ECCO TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters containing a sketch of the politics of France: from the thirty-first of May 1793, till the twenty-eighth of July 1794, and of the scenes which have passed in the prisons of Paris. By Helen Maria Williams. ... (London : printed for G. G. and J. Robinson, 1795) (HTML at ECCO TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters on the events which have passed in France since the restoration in 1815. (London, Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1820) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters on the events which have passed in France since the Restoration in 1815. Microform (London, Baldwin, Cradock & Joy, 1819) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters written in France. (London : printed for G. G. J. and J. Robinson, 1792) (HTML at ECCO TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters written in France (Printed at Boston, : by J. Belknap and A. Young. Sold at their printing-office, no. 34, Newbury Street, and by the booksellers in town and country., MDCCXCI[-MDCCXCII]. [1791-1792]) (HTML at Evans TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters written in France (Boston: : Printed [by J. Belknap and A. Young] for Thomas and Andrews, David West, and E. Larkin, Jun., M.DCC,XCII. [1792]) (HTML at Evans TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters written in France, in the summer 1790, to a friend in England: containing various anecdotes relative to the French Revolution; and Memoirs of Mons. and Madame Du F------. (London, T. Cadell, 1794) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Letters written in France, in the summer 1790, to a friend in England; containing, various anecdotes relative to the French revolution; and memoirs of Mons. and Madame Du F---. By Helen Maria Williams. (London,T. Cadell, 1791) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Lettres sur les evénemens qui se sont passés en France : depuis le 31 mai 1793 jusqu'au 10 Thermidor / (À Paris : l'Imprimerie de la Rue de Vaugirard, [1795?]) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Lolotte et Fanfan. English (--Baltimore:-- : Printed for Thomas, Andrews, and Butler, no. 184, Market Street. By Warner and Hanna, Harrison Street., 1799), also by M. Ducray-Duminil, trans. by Lucy Peacock (HTML at Evans TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A narrative of the events which have taken place in France from the landing of Naopleon Bonaparte on the first of March, 1815, till the restoration of Louis XVIII ; with an account of the state of society and public opinion at that period. (Cleveland : [publisher not identified], 1895) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A narrative of the events which have taken place in France : from the landing of Napoleon Bonaparte, on the 1st of March, 1815, till the restoration of Louis XVIII : with an account of the present state of society and public opinion / (London : Printed for John Murray ..., 1815), also by John Murray (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A narrative of the events which have taken place in France from the landing of Napoleon Bonaparte on the first of March, 1815, till the restoration of Louis XVIII. With an account of the state of society and public opinion at that period. (Cleveland, The Burrows brothers co., 1895) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A narrative of the events which have taken place in France, from the landing of Napoleon Bonaparte on the first of March, 1815, till the restoration of Louis XVIII. With an account of the present state of society and public opinion. (Philadelphia: Published by Moses Thomas., 1816) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A narrative of the events which have taken place in France ... with an account of the present state of society and public opinion. (London, J. Murray, 1815) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: An ode on the Peace / (London : Printed for T. Cadell ..., 1783), also by T. Cadell (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, trans.: Paul and Virginia: (New York, E. Walker, 1841), by Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, illust. by Richard Westall (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Paul and Virginia (New York: C. S. Francis & Co., 1854), also by Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, John William Orr, and C.S. Francis & Co (page images at Florida)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, trans.: Paul and Virginia: tr. from the French of Bernardin St. Pierre, (Boston, Lilly, Wait & co., 1834), by Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, illust. by Richard Westall (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the New continent, during the years 1799-1804. (Philadelphia : Published by M. Carey, no. 121 Chesnut street. Dec. 23. [Geo. Phillips, Printer, Carlisle.], 1815), also by Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, trans.: Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the New Continent during the years 1799-1804, (London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1818-21), by Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the new continent during the years 1799-1804 / (London : Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1814-1829), also by Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, trans.: Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the New continent, during the years 1799-1804, (London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 18--), by Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827, trans.: Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the New Continent, during the years 1799-1804, by Atexander de Humboldt, and Aimé Bonpland / (London : Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown...; J. Murray...; and H. Colburn, 1814-1829), by Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Personal narrative of travels to the equinoctial regions of the New continent during the years 1799-1804 / (London : G. Bell, 1877), also by Alexander von Humboldt (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A poem on the bill lately passed for regulating the slave trade / (London : Printed for T. Cadell, 1788) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Poems (1786), Volume I. (Gutenberg ebook)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Poems / (London : Printed for T. Cadell, 1791) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Poems, moral, elegant and pathetic: vis. Essay on man, (London, Printed for E. Newbery, 1796), also by Alexander Pope (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Poems, moral, elegant and pathetic: viz., Essay on man, by Pope; The monk of La Trappe, by Jerningham; The grave, by Blair; An elegy in a country churchyard, by Gray; The hermit of Warkworth, by Percy; and Original sonnets, by Helen Maria Williams. (London : Newverry, 1801) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: The political and confidential correspondence of Lewis XVI. with observations on each letter. (New York : Printed for H. Caritat, 1803), also by François Babié de Bercenay and comte de La Platière Sulpice Imbert (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Relation des évèvemens qui se sont passés en France depuis le débarquement de Napoléon Buonaparte. (Paris : J. G. Dentu, 1816), trans. by M. Breton (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Researches, concerning the institutions & monuments of the ancient inhabitants of America : with descriptions and views of some of the most striking scenes in the Cordilleras! / (London : Published by Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown, J. Murray & H. Colburn, 1814), also by Alexander von Humboldt (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A residence in France during the years 1792, 1793, 1794, and 1795 / (London : Printed for T. N. Longman, 1797), also by Charlotte Biggs and John Gifford (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Seraphina: a novel. / From the French of M. Mercier. ; To which is added Auguste & Madelaine. A real history. By Miss Helen Maria Williams. (Charlestown [Mass.]: : Printed by John Lamson., 1797), also by Louis-Sébastien Mercier (HTML at Evans TCP)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Sketch of the Politics of France, 1793-94. (London, 1795) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Sketches of the state of manners and opinions in the French republic, towards the close of the eighteenth century. In a series of letters. (London, G. G. and J. Robinson, 1801) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: A tour in Switzerland; or, A view of the present state of the governments and manners of those cantons: with comparative sketches of the present state of Paris. (London. G. G. and J. Robinson, 1798) (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Un séjour en France de 1792 à 1795; (Paris, Hachette et cie, 1883), trans. by Hippolyte Taine (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Un séjour en France de 1792 à 1795; (Paris, Hachette et cie, 1872), trans. by Hippolyte Taine (page images at HathiTrust)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Un séjour en France de 1792 à 1795; lettres d'un témoin de la Révolution francaise. (Paris, Hachette, 1900), also by Hippolyte Taine (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Un séjour en France de 1792 à 1795 : lettres d'un témoin de la révolution française / (Paris : Hachette, 1895), also by Charlotte Biggs and Hippolyte Taine (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)
[X-Info] Williams, Helen Maria, 1762-1827: Williams's letters. ([London, G. G. and J. Robinson, 1794-1796]) (page images at HathiTrust)

See also what's at your library, or elsewhere.

Edited by John Mark Ockerbloom (onlinebooks@pobox.upenn.edu)
OBP copyright and licenses.
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dai



Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 2853

PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah well - badly prepared - but this is real life and a messy business ... a really pleasant evening and ideal for casual political conversations instead of ... reading " The Bastille Falls " by Simon Schama - a Pocket Penguin ( 21 ) ... when may be I should have been watching ... The Campaign ...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tZQQGS6iBuc

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CeXUo-UgXRs

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=v6SEBCk4eso

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=l_yBhqoOFqU

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LWvlz9E5Zok

... I ought to write a proper thread on Helen Maria Williams : I intended to produce a leaflet for this but I was quite ill ...
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